My name is Mariam Moshi. I love in Modesto, California. I was born in Iraq but in 2003 my family and I had to flew to Syria I was 9 at that time. I lived in Syria for 10 years and in 2012 I came to Modesto and have been living here for almost 7 years. DISCUSSION TOPIC

DISCUSSION TOPIC

1. Name
2. Where you live now, and list other places where you have lived.
3. What is your ultimate vacation spot (with unlimited money)? Identify city and country.
a.  Identify the latitude and longitude (in degrees) for your vacation location using the table at the            end of the atlas (p.262 – 370). Cite page of your information (Goode’s World Atlas, page…).
b.  Estimate the  July Normal Temperature, page 17 (Goode’s World Atlas).  Cite source of data          (author, page). Be sure to use category on the map, such as 70  -90 degrees Fahrenheit.
c.  Describe the cause for the temperature this region receives in July.  Be sure to have read         chapter 1-4 and lecture 1-4 prior to answering this prompt.  Address the subsolar location, angle         of incidence, oceanality/continentality, circle of illumination…if applicable.
d.  List the Radiation this region receives (p. 81, Geosystems).

Helloclassmates.eml

Hello classmates, My name is Mariam Moshi. I love in Modesto, California. I was born in Iraq but in 2003 my family and I had to flew to Syria I was 9 at that time. I lived in Syria for 10 years and in 2012 I came to Modesto and have been living here for almost 7 years. My ultimate vacation will be Jerusalem, Israel I’m going there by next year in April. a.According to page 306 (Good’s World Atlas ), Jerusalem is located at 31 degrees North, 35 degrees East b.Jerusalem weather for July is 83-66 Fahrenheit ( Good’s, page 17) Sent from my iPhone

Hello classmates,

  1. My name is Mariam Moshi. I love in Modesto, California. I was born in Iraq but in 2003 my family and I had to flew to Syria I was 9 at that time. I lived in Syria for 10 years and in 2012 I came to Modesto and have been living here for almost 7 years.
  2. My ultimate vacation will be Jerusalem, Israel I’m going there by next year in April.
  3. a.According to page 306 (Good’s World Atlas ), Jerusalem is located at 31 degrees North, 35 degrees East b.Jerusalem weather for July is 83-66 Fahrenheit ( Good’s, page 17)

Sent from my iPhone

Calculate the speed of sound and the Alfvén velocity in the solar wind at Earth’s orbit. Compare your answers with the quiet solar wind velocity.

PLANETARY SCIENCE

Textbook 7.2.E. Calculate the speed of sound and the Alfvén velocity in the solar wind at Earth’s orbit. Compare your answers with the quiet solar wind velocity.

Textbook 7.7 E. The Gauss coefficients for Jupiter’s magnetic field are: g01 = 4.218, g11 = −0.664, and h11 = 0.264 gauss. Calculate the magnetic dipole moment, the angle between the magnetic and rotational angle, and the longitude of the magnetic north pole

Examine the pros and cons from the perspective of Crestview Hospital of the placement of its new billboard directly adjacent to Briarwood Medical Center. Interpret the reaction of customers and other community stakeholders to the billboard postings.

HEALTH SERVICES

Write a four to six (4-6) page paper in which you:

  1. Examine the pros and cons from the perspective of Crestview Hospital of the placement of its new billboard directly adjacent to Briarwood Medical Center. Interpret the reaction of customers and other community stakeholders to the billboard postings.
  2. Use competitive marketing entry strategies to suggest the action that Briarwood Hospital should undertake to counter the messages in the new Crestview Hospital Billboard postings.
  3. Recommend the marketing communication strategy or strategies that both Crestview and Briarwood Hospitals should employ. Justify why the Governing Board of both hospitals should take a proactive role in promoting and implementing effective marketing strategies.
  4. Assess the value of the various marketing research tool(s) that Briarwood and Crestview hospital could use to promote effective marketing communication strategies. Justify your response.
  5. Use at least five (5) quality academic resources. Note: Wikipedia and other Websites do not qualify as academic resources.
  6. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements:
  • Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.
  • Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required assignment page length.
  • The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:
  • Evaluate marketing research tools involved in the marketing process.
  • Formulate competitive market entry strategies based on analysis of global markets that comply to initiatives in the health care industry.
  • Determine the marketing communications strategy used in health care services.
  • Use technology and information resources to research issues in health services strategic marketing.
  • Write clearly and concisely about health services strategic marketing using proper writing mechanics.
  • Grading for this assignment will be based on answer quality, logic / organization of the paper, and language and writing skills, using the following rubric found here.
  1. By submitting this paper, you agree: (1) that you are submitting your paper to be used and stored as part of the SafeAssign™ services in accordance with the Blackboard Privacy Policy; (2) that your institution may use your paper in accordance with your institution’s policies; and (3) that your use of SafeAssign will be without recourse against Blackboard Inc. and its affiliates.
  2. https://blackboard.strayer.edu/bbcswebdav/institution/HSA/505/1138/case-studies/64487_CH08_Fortenberry_Missed-Opportunities.pdf

IDENTIFYING GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND LAND-FORMS

IDENTIFYING 13+ GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND LAND-FORMS

Identifying more than 13 geomorphic features and land-forms (rock types, formations, etc.) from the photos. Please note that you need to identify these features that you have learned in your college geography course. Features that you could have identified before taking the course will not count for credit.  Examples of things that count are: composite volcano, sandstone deposit, karst topography, braided stream, coastal features etc.  Examples of things that do not count are: valley, water, hill, place, stuff,  etc.

There are total 18 photos. Please help to me define the relevant geometric features and land forms. Some photos are same geomorphic features, or are not available for definition. Therefore, you only need to define more than 13 photos. You will need to write a discussion piece of at least three college level sentences per land-form. Please treat this assignment as a research journal- use citations sources.

The four main precipitation types we will be investigating are rain, snow, sleet, and freezing rain.

ATMO FORECASTING PRECIPITATION

In the activity below you will be analyzing four stuve diagrams and using them to then forecast the most likely kind of precipitation that fell at those locations on the days the sounding was taken.

ForecastingPrecipitation.docx

Forecasting Precipitation Types Name __________________________

The four main precipitation types we will be investigating are rain, snow, sleet, and freezing rain.

1. On the diagram below, fill in the name of each phase change:

GAS LIQUID SOLID

2. Each of these precipitation types are produced by phase changes of water. Describe the ALL the phase changes and other processes that happen to produce each type of precipitation (for some there might be multiple ways to form them):

RAIN

SNOW

SLEET

FREEZING RAIN

3. Look at the upper air diagrams (stuve) on the following pages. For each location describe how the (a) temperature (how does T change as you go up, you can describe this in pressure layers) and

(b) moisture characteristics (how close or far are T and Td as you go up, describe in pressure layers)

change as you rise through the atmosphere.

Make sure you include the surface temperature, what layers are above or below 0 degrees C, and the maximum temperature observed.

SGF Springfield

(a)

(b)

SLE Salem

(a)

(b)

TBW Tampa Bay

(a)

(b)

SLC Salt Lake City

(a)

(b)

4. Looking at the information you described in questions 1 and 2, as well as the upper air diagrams (stuve) on the following pages, provide a forecast what precipitation type you think will fall at each location. Hint: Each precipitation type will only be used once. Why did you produce that forecast?

SGF Springfield Precipitation Type ____________________

WHY?

SLE Salem Precipitation Type ____________________

WHY?

TBW Tampa Bay Precipitation Type ____________________

WHY?

SLC Salt Lake City Precipitation Type ____________________

WHY?

5. Which precipitation type do you think would have the biggest impact if it fell on a large city? WHY?

6. Imagine that a storm moves into Salt Lake City at 8am. From 8-10am the precipitation falls as rain, from 10-11am the precipitation falls as sleet, and from 11am-5pm the precipitation falls as snow. Describe and/or sketch how the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere over Salt Lake City might have changed throughout the day.

How does the brightness of each side of the wax block compare when the bulbs are both equal distances from the wax? a) Both sides of the wax are approximately the same brightness b) The left side of the wax is noticeably brighter c) The right side of the wax is noticeably brighter

BRIGHTNESS AT VARYING DISTANCE

o-Do Date: Apr 5 at 11:59pm

To complete this lab please do the following:

1. READ the intro paragraphs to understand what is happening to the lab.

2. View the Prediction Demo Video first to complete questions 1-2.

3. Open the simulation and complete questions 3-11. REMEMBER TO SHOW ALL MATH WORK!!

4.  Once #11 is completed you may view the Verification Demo Video  to verify whether your conclusions are indeed correct.

6. For the 2nd data table note that B and B1 are different values from the data table in #3. Solve 13-14 based off of the method of table 2. REMEMBER TO SHOW ALL MATH WORK!!

7. Print out the last page of the lab and use a ruler to complete Part 2. REMEMBER TO SHOW ALL MATH WORK!!

BrightnessatVaryingDistances-Lab.docx

Brightness at Varying Distances Lab

Image by Borb CC license: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverse-square_law#/media/File:Inverse_square_law.svg

Purpose: In this lab, you will look at how light leaving a star “spreads out” and how this spreading can be used to determine the brightness of the star at different distances. While the focus of this lab is on light, your results will apply equally well to sound and the loudness of sounds at varying distances.

Equipment: This lab uses the optics bench, a square of aluminum foil sandwiched between two squares of paraffin wax, a lens holder to hold the wax, three incandescent light bulbs of equal wattage with bases, and three optics stands. The lab also requires access to the internet and a ruler.

Let’s start this lab by introducing the basic question that we want to answer.

Part 1: Introducing the Question

At the front of the class is an optics bench with two identical light bulbs on opposite sides of a wax block. In the center of the wax block is a piece of reflective foil. The foil ensures that each side of the wax is only illuminated by one of the light bulbs.

In a moment, the instructor will turn on the light bulbs and turn off the overhead light.

1. How does the brightness of each side of the wax block compare when the bulbs are both equal distances from the wax? a) Both sides of the wax are approximately the same brightness b) The left side of the wax is noticeably brighter c) The right side of the wax is noticeably brighter

Your question for this experiment is: If we add a second identical light bulb to the left side of the optics track, how far must the two light bulbs be from the wax in order to make both sides of the wax appear equally bright?

2. What is your prediction? If the single light bulb on the right side is 20 cm from the wax, how far away do you think the two light bulbs will need to be from the wax in order to produce an equal amount of brightness on their side of the wax?

Part 2: Computer Simulation

Open your internet browser and go to the online Flux Simulator at http://astro.unl.edu/classaction/animations/stellarprops/lightdetector.html. The simulation shows two light bulbs and two light sensors. The number on the sensors can be considered a numerical value of the brightness at that location. Take a few minutes to play around with the controls and see what you can do to increase and decrease the brightness readings.

3*. Set the wattage of the top bulb to 50 and use the simulation and your calculator to fill in the table below. For columns 3 and 4, note that B1 is always 3.979.

Distance from bulb Brightness Value B1/R B1/R2
R = 1.0 B1 = 3.979
R = 2.0 B =
R = 3.0 B =
R = 4.0 B =
R = 5.0 B =

*Note that in the last column, only R is squared, B1 is not being squared.

4. The brightness value at R = 2.0 is:

a) approximately half of the brightness value at R = 1.0

b) significantly more than half of the brightness value at R = 1.0

c) significantly less than half of the brightness value at R = 1.0

Your answer to Question 4 tells us that the brightness does not decrease linearly with distance. The brightness decreases faster than linearly.

5*. Use your table to determine which equation below best represents the brightness at different distances.

6*. Let’s try out our equation. Calculate what you think B would be at a distance of R = 2.3. Show your work.

Move the sensor in the simulation to R = 2.3 and check that you get the same result as from your calculation above.

7*. Calculate what you think the brightness value would be at R = 7.0. Show your work.

8*. Based on your results so far, make another prediction about the opening question. Do you think the two light bulbs will need to be: a) less than 40 cm from the wax block

b) approximately 40 cm from the wax block

c) more than 40 cm from the wax block

9*. Discuss your answer above with the instructor and obtain his/her initials indicating that you have considered how your results above relate to our opening question.

Let’s try to model our opening question is the simulation. Set the top bulb to 50 Watts and the bottom bulb to 25 Watts. Try to use the simulation to answer our opening question.

10*. Describe how you used the simulation to answer our opening question. Where did you move each object? What values are you comparing?

11*. Based on your simulation results: If a single bulb is 20 cm from the wax block, what distance from the wax block should the two bulbs be in order to produce equal brightness on the wax?

12. Compare your answer for Question 11 with another group. Do your answers agree? Did you do the same thing in the simulation to determine your answers?

**Once everyone is ready, the instructor will turn off the classroom lights and demonstrate the two bulbs vs. one bulb arrangement either confirming or contradicting your answer above.

Let’s use our new understanding of brightness at varying distances to think about what the Sun would look like from other planets. To help us answer these questions, let’s go back and notice a pattern in your results from the simulation. Use the results in your table above to fill in the following table:

R = 2.0 (twice as far away) B/B1 = 1/22 =
R = 3.0 (three times as far away) B/B1 = 1/32 =
R = 4.0 (four times as far away) B/B1 = 1/42 =
R = 5.0 (five times as far away) B/B1 = 1/52 =

This table shows us that if an object is three times farther away, it will appear approximately 1/32 = 1/9th as bright. If an object is five times farther away, it will appear approximately 1/52 = 1/25th as bright. And so on. This pattern even works for moving objects closer. If an object is half as far away, it will appear times as bright. Use this pattern of reasoning to answer the next two questions.

13*. Neptune is 30 times farther from the Sun than the Earth. How would the brightness of the Sun viewed from Neptune compare to the brightness of the Sun viewed from Earth? Your answer should be a numerical value (1/2 as bright, 1/40 as bright, something like that).

14*. Mercury is 4/10 as far from the Sun as the Earth. How would the brightness of the Sun viewed from Mercury compare to the brightness of the Sun viewed from Earth? Your answer should be a numerical value.

Why 1/r2?

Why does the brightness behave this way; why is the equation B = B1/r2? It is because we live in a three-dimensional world. Imagine turning the bulb on for a millisecond and then turning it off again. During the millisecond that the bulb is on, it emits a flash of light in all directions. As the light leaves the bulb, it spreads out in all directions like an explosion. As the flash of light travels outward in all directions, the light (electromagnetic energy) becomes spread over the surface of a sphere. As the light moves farther away from the bulb, the sphere and its surface get larger causing the light energy to be more spread out meaning less of the total light hits your eye or the wax block. The surface area of a sphere is given by 4r2. This is where the r2 in our brightness equation comes from. If we lived in a two-dimensional world, then the light would spread out over the surface of a circle and the equation would be B = B1/r. If we lived in a four-dimensional world, then the light would spread over the surface of a hypersphere and the equation would be B = B1/r3. You could say that our experiment today proved that we live in a three-dimensional world. (Or at least a world with three dimensions large enough to be noticed.)

Part 2: Using Apparent Brightness to Estimate Stellar Distances*

The apparent brightness of different celestial objects can vary significantly, by many orders of magnitude. In order to have smaller values and ranges of values to work with, astronomers classify the apparent brightness of stars, planets, and other celestial objects by a number called ‘apparent magnitude’. This system was introduced about 2000 years ago with the astronomer Hipparchus gave the brightest appearing stars a value of 1. Stars that appeared somewhat dimmer were given apparent magnitude values of 2 and so on so that the larger the apparent magnitude, the dimmer the star appears. In the mid 19th century the apparent magnitude system was revised on a more systematic basis. As a result, we now have apparent magnitude values of zero and even negative values for stars that appear very bright.

You know from the first part of this lab, that the apparent brightness of a star depends on both its distance from us and its wattage. The tables on the following page give some helpful apparent magnitude and wattage values.

*Based on Using Apparent Brightness to Estimate Stellar Distances from The Universe in Your Hands

Apparent Magnitude Object
-26.7 Sun
-12.5 Full Moon
-2.5 Jupiter (at its brightest)
-1.5 Sirius (brightest star)
6.5 Limit with unaided eye on darkest night
13.0 Limit with 8-inch telescope
24.0 Limit with 200-inch telescope
28.0 Limit with Hubble Space Telescope
Wattage Object
Watts Sun
Watts Trinity atom-bomb test
200 Watts Light bulb
1 Watt Candle
Watts Firefly (lightning bug)

On the last page of this activity is a nomogram. The nomogram is a chart that allows you to convert between wattage, apparent magnitude, and distance using a ruler rather than an equation. As long as you know two out of the three quantities (wattage, apparent magnitude, and distance) you can use a ruler to connect the two quantities you do know and read off the value of the third unknown quantity.

1. Use the nomogram and the apparent magnitude and wattage values above to determine the distance to the Sun. Check your result with the instructor.

2*. What would be the apparent magnitude of a 200 Watt light bulb if it were 100 m from you?

3*. What astronomical object has approximately the same apparent magnitude as the light bulb in Question 2?

4*. How far would you have to be from a burning candle for it to be barely visible to the unaided eye? (It’s surprisingly far.)

5. The distance in question 4 is surely much larger than you would have guessed. Offer two possible explanations for why the value in 4 is so surprisingly large.

6*. How far would you have had to be from the Trinity atom bomb test for it to have had the same apparent magnitude as the Sun?

7*. The distance from Earth to Sirius is about 9 light years (l.y.). What is the wattage of Sirius?

8*. How far would you have to be from Sirius for it to appear as bright as the Sun?

Howard Community College – ASTR 114 Page 8

Howard Community College – ASTR 114 Page 7

How do astronomers determine the physical characteristics of stars? Match each characteristic of stars with an important technique that astronomers use to determine that characteristic. Refer to Table 18.2 and page 660 in Chapter 19 when answering this question. Each answer will be used once.

ASTRONOMY

1. Matching: How do astronomers determine the physical characteristics of stars? Match each characteristic of stars with an important technique that astronomers use to determine that characteristic. Refer to Table 18.2 and page 660 in Chapter 19 when answering this question. Each answer will be used once.

 

How do   Astronomers determine the …

of a   star?

Technique

 

Surface   temperature

 

Radial Velocity

 

Mass

 

Diameter

 

Luminosity

 

Distance

Techniques for Question 1: Measure the apparent brightness and determine the distance to the star / Measure the Doppler shift / Measure the light curves and Doppler shifts for eclipsing binary stars / Measure the star’s parallax / Measure the peak wavelength of the star’s spectrum and apply Wien’s Law / Measure the period and radial velocity curves for spectroscopic binary stars

2. Matching: (Review Question 4 on page 682 in OSA) Which method would you use to obtain the distance to each of the following? Choose the best answer below:

 

Method

 

A. An asteroid crossing Earth’s orbit

 

B. A star astronomers believe to be no more   than 50 light-years from the Sun

 

C. A tight group of stars in the Milky Way   Galaxy that includes a significant number of variable stars.

 

D. A star that is not variable but for which   you can obtain a clearly defined spectrum.

Methods for Question 2: RR Lyrae and/or Cepheid variable stars can be used to determine the distance / Measure the parallax of the object and calculate the distance by triangulation / The information you have is sufficient to allow you to place the star in the correct location on the H-R diagram; this allows you to accurately estimate the object’s luminosity and, using the inverse-square law, its distance / Send a radar beam toward the object and measure the return time

3. (Review Question 5 on page 682 in OSA) What are the luminosity class and spectral type of a star with an effective temperature of 5000 K and a luminosity of 100 Lsun?

A. First, calculate the radius of the star relative to the Sun using the equation L*/Lsun = (R*/Rsun)2 (T*/Tsun)4. The radius of this star is ( 1/100 times / 1/10 times / 1/5.5 times / the same as / 10 times / 13.5 times / 100 times) the radius of the Sun.

B. The luminosity class of this star is ( Ia / Ib / II / III / IV / V / wd ). This indicates that it is a ( Bright Supergiant / Less Luminous Supergiant / Bright Giant / Giant / Subgiant / Main Sequence / White Dwarf ) star. If you need help, refer to page 676 in OSA.

C. The spectral type of this star is ( O / B / A / F / G / K / M ). If you need help, refer to Table 17.2 on page 601 in OSA.

4. What are the spectral type and luminosity class of the star Regulus which has a surface temperature of 10,750 K and a luminosity of 220 Lsun? Regulus is in the constellation Leo and represents the Lion’s Heart.

A. First, calculate the radius of Regulus relative to the Sun using the equation L*/Lsun = (R*/Rsun)2 (T*/Tsun)4. The radius of the star Regulus is ( 1/220 times / 1/20 times / 1/13.5 times / the same as / 4.3 times / 20 times / 220 times) the radius of the Sun.

B. The spectral type of this star is ( O / B / A / F / G / K / M ). If you need help, refer to Table 17.2 on page 601 in OSA.

C. The luminosity class of this star is ( Ia / Ib / II / III / IV / V / wd ). This indicates that it is a ( Bright Supergiant / Less Luminous Supergiant / Bright Giant / Giant / Subgiant / Main Sequence / White Dwarf ) star. This is not easy to interpret using Figure 19.15 in OSA. I recommend that, instead, you determine where Regulus would plot on the H-R diagram we used for questions 7 and 8 on the Chapter 18 homework; this version is easier to interpret because it is contoured in terms of solar diameters.

5. (Thought Question 18 on page 683 in OSA) A G2 star has a luminosity 100 times that of the Sun. What kind of star is it? How does its radius compare to that of the Sun? Refer to Figure 19.15 when answering part A of this question.

A. The luminosity class of this star is ( Ia / Ib / II / III / IV / V / wd ); it is a ( Bright Supergiant / Less Luminous Supergiant / Bright Giant / Giant / Subgiant / Main Sequence / White Dwarf ) star.

B. The radius of this star is ( 1/100 times / 1/10 times / the same as / 10 times / 100 times ) that of the Sun.

6. (Thought Question 19 on page 683 in OSA) A star has a temperature of 10,000 K and a luminosity 10-2 Lsun. What kind of star is it? Refer to Figure 19.15 when answering this question.

The luminosity class of this star is ( Ia / Ib / II / III / IV / V / wd ); it is a ( Bright Supergiant / Less Luminous Supergiant / Bright Giant / Giant / Subgiant / Main Sequence / White Dwarf ) star.

7. (Thought Question 20 on page 683 in OSA) What is the advantage of measuring a parallax distance to a star as compared to our other distance measuring methods?

a. Results from the parallax method can be directly compared to results from measuring the periods of Cepheid variable stars since there are a number of these stars located close to our Solar System.

b. Distances calculated by the parallax method do not rely on any assumptions made about the star; these distances depend only on geometric calculations.

c. As long as a clear spectrum of the star can be obtained, its distance can be calculated using the parallax method.

8. (Thought Question 21 on page 683 in OSA) What is the disadvantage of the parallax method, especially for studying distant parts of the Galaxy? The parallax method can only be used ______.

a. for stars that are relatively close to us in the Milky Way Galaxy.

b. if a clear spectrum of the star can be obtained.

c. if the star of interest is part of a binary system.

d. if the star of interest is a particular type of variable star.

9. (Thought Question 24 on page 683 in OSA) Why would it be easier to measure the characteristics of intrinsically less luminous Cepheids than more luminous ones?

The relationship that pertains specifically to Cepheid variable stars is the ( Hertzsprung-Russell / period-luminosity / mass-luminosity / Stefan-Boltzmann ) relationship. Hence, the most important characteristic that astronomers want to measure for a Cepheid variable star is ( its surface temperature / its Doppler shift / its absorption lines / the period of its light curve ). It would be easier to make this measurement for a less luminous Cepheid because ( it is easier to measure low surface temperatures rather than high surface temperatures / these have a greater Doppler shift / they have stronger absorption lines / the period for less-luminous Cepheids is shorter making it easier to measure).

10. When Henrietta Leavitt discovered the period-luminosity relationship, she used Cepheid variable stars that were all located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). It was (easier / more difficult ) to compare Cepheids in the LMC rather than those located in the Milky Way Galaxy because they are all ( about the same distance away / located at widely varying distances from Earth ). As a result ( differences in apparent brightness are directly related to differences in intrinsic brightness of these stars / all of these stars have the same Doppler shift / all of these stars have the same proper motion ).

11. (Figuring for Yourself Question 28 on page 684 in OSA) Estimate the minimum and maximum time it takes a radar signal to make the round trip between Earth and Venus, which has a semimajor axis of 0.72 AU. Hint: draw a diagram! See the one-slide PowerPoint titled “Superior and Inferior Conjunctions” if you need help.

The minimum distance between the Earth and Venus (inferior conjunction) is _____ AU. Your answer should be in the format x.xx.

The maximum distance between the Earth and Venus (superior conjunction) is _____ AU. Your answer should be in the format x.xx.

How long does it take a radar signal to make the round trip between the Earth and Venus when Venus is at its minimum distance from Earth (inferior conjunction)? It takes a radar signal ____ minutes and ____ seconds to travel between the Earth and Venus and back when they are at their minimum possible distance apart. Enter a whole number in each blank; the number in the second blank should be less than 60.

How long does it take a radar signal to make the round trip between the Earth and Venus when Venus is at its maximum distance from Earth (superior conjunction)? It takes a radar signal ____ minutes and ____ seconds to travel between the Earth and Venus and back when they are at their maximum possible distance apart. Enter a whole number in each blank; the number in the second blank should be less than 60.

12. (Figuring for Yourself Questions 38 and 39 on page 684 in OSA) The most recently discovered system close to Earth is a pair of brown dwarfs known as Luhman 16. It has a distance of 6.5 light years.

A. How many parsecs is this? _______ parsecs. Round your answer to the nearest whole number.

B. What would the parallax of Luhman 16 be as measured from Earth? The parallax of Luhman 16 is ______ arcseconds. You may enter your answer as a fraction or a decimal number.

13. The star Fomalhaut is 25 light-years from us. What is this distance in parsecs? ____ parsecs; your answer should be in the format x.x. What would be the parallax of Fomalhaut? ______ arcseconds; give your answer in the format x.xx

14. Star A has a parallax of 0.4 seconds of arc, while star B has a parallax of 0.06 seconds of arc. Which star is closer? Star A is ( closer to / farther from ) Earth than Star B.

Star A has a parallax of 0.4 seconds of arc. Star A is ( 0.06 / 0.4 / 1.3 / 2.5 / 5 / 10.6 / 16.7 ) ( parsecs / light-years) from Earth.

Star B has a parallax of 0.06 seconds of arc. Star B is ( 0.06 / 0.4 / 1.3 / 2.5 / 5 / 10.6 / 16.7 ) ( parsecs / light-years) from Earth.

15. The parallax of the star Regulus is 0.042 arcseconds. What is the distance to Regulus in parsecs? ______ parsecs; your answer should be in the format xx.x. What is the distance to Regulus in light-years? ______ light-years; round your answer to the nearest whole number.

16. (Question 40 from A. Frank, 2016, page 103) Two stars are known to have the same luminosity, but one appears one-sixteenth (1/16) as bright as the other. How many more times distant is the dimmer star?

The dimmer star is ____ times more distant than the brighter star. Enter a whole number in the blank.

17. (Question 41 from A. Frank, 2016, page 103) Star A is 9 times as far away as star B. Both appear to have the same brightness. What is the ratio of the luminosity of star A to that of star B?

Star A is ____ times as luminous as star B. Enter a whole number in the blank.

18. (Figuring for Yourself Question 41 on page 684 in OSA) What physical properties are different for an M giant with a luminosity of 1000 Lsun and an M dwarf with a luminosity of 0.5 Lsun? What physical properties are the same? Place “same” or “different” in each blank.

 

Surface   temperature

 

Diameter

 

Luminosity

Compare the United States with a developing country of your choice and conduct some research. How do the factors given in the I=PAT equation differ for these two countries? Can you calculate or find actual calculations of the value I?

DISCUSS HUMAN POPULATION GROWTH, AFFLUENCE, AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Population growth is critical to environmental change. The IPAT equation (from both Week 1 and 2 readings) is an equation that describes four variables that interact to produce environmental change:

I = P x A x T

where I reflects the environmental impact, P the population size, A the level of affluence/consumption per person, and T the impact of technology use.

This week, we are learning about past, current, and projected future population growth and the underlying factors and causes. We also explore some different population growth scenarios in the Week 2 – Eco Moment (Population Growth Calculator).

Based on your understanding of these issues, please answer the following questions:

  1. Given this equation, what drives environmental decline?
  2. Compare the United States with a developing country of your choice and conduct some research. How do the factors given in the I=PAT equation differ for these two countries? Can you calculate or find actual calculations of the value I?
  3. Describe one or two of the most pressing environmental issues faced by the developing country you selected. How are these issues related to population growth and affluence in this country? Consider age structure, population growth rate, and standard of living here.

Please select a developing country not yet discussed by a classmate for your main response and include the name of the country in the header for your post. When responding to your classmates, please add to the discussion with a fact-supported addition, opinion, gentle correction, or example, citing reliable sources.

What industries or product categories could if diversify into that would allow it to achieve economies of scale? (refer attached related 3 and incorporate the points in attachment and elaborate)

OPERATIONAL PLANNING – FOLLOW ALL THE BELOW POINTS AND ALSO ATTACHED, NEED ANSWERS FOR ALL THE POINTS BELOW IN APA FORMAT WITH AT LEAST 500 WORDS EXCLUDING REFERENCES, TITLE AND NO PLAGIARISM AND NEED PLAGIARISM REPORT

Related Diversification. Related Diversification is the most popular distinction between the different types of diversification and is made with regard to how close the field of diversification is to the field of the existing business activities. Related Diversification occurs when a company adds to or expands its existing line of production or markets.

1) For this assignment, consider a company of your choice. Assume your company opted to pursue a strategy of related diversification and respond to the following questions.

2) Explain why company has chosen this related diversification (by referring attached related 1, related 2 and incorporate points from attached and elaborate)

3) What industries or product categories could if diversify into that would allow it to achieve economies of scale? (refer attached related 3 and incorporate the points in attachment and elaborate)

4) Identify at least two or three such industries or product categories?

5) Describe the specific kinds of cost savings that might accrue from entry into each (by referring related -3 and incorporate the points as stated in attachment and elaborate)

6) Incorporate our coursework (Thompson text and other material) from this week into your above responses.

Submission Details:

7) Your analysis should be 500 words or more.

8) Incorporate a minimum of at least one course (Thompson text) and one non-course scholarly/peer reviewed source in your paper and give the complete URL from where these references have been retrieved

9) All written assignments must include a coverage page, introductory and concluding paragraphs, reference page, be double-spaced, and proper in-text citations using APA guidelines.

10) Follow all the above points without even missing one point

Over the course of the Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history, the climate has changed a lot. This is true. But the rapid warming we’re seeing now can’t be explained by natural cycles of warming and cooling. The kind of changes that would normally happen over hundreds of thousands of years are happening in decades. 

CLIMATE MYTH VS CLIMATE SCIENCE

Topics I•

There are many information and misinformation about Climate change online and some news outlet.

•Please check out some typical arguments about climate change

•Myth vs Science
•https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

•https://www.wwf.org.uk/updates/10-myths-about-climate-change

Please pick one topic

•At first, the Myth claim sounds plausible to you, e.g. like this one.

•Climate’s changed before•Climate is always changing. We have had ice ages and warmer periods when alligators were found in Spitzbergen. Ice ages have occurred in a hundred thousand year cycle for the last 700 thousand years, and there have been previous periods that appear to have been warmer than the present despite CO2 levels being lower than they are now. More recently, we have had the medieval warm period and the little ice age. (Richard Lindzen)

•But after you read current scientific studies

•Basic

•https://www.skepticalscience.com/climate-change-little-ice-age-medieval-warm-period-basic.htm

•Intermediate

•https://www.skepticalscience.com/climate-change-little-ice-age-medieval-warm-period-intermediate.htm

Or as discussed on

https://www.wwf.org.uk/updates/10-myths-about-climate-change

1. THE EARTH’S CLIMATE HAS ALWAYS CHANGED

•Over the course of the Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history, the climate has changed a lot. This is true. But the rapid warming we’re seeing now can’t be explained by natural cycles of warming and cooling. The kind of changes that would normally happen over hundreds of thousands of years are happening in decades.

•Global temperatures are now at their highest since records began. In fact, 17 of the 18 warmest years on record have all taken place since 2001.

•This much faster warming corresponds with levels of carbon dioxide ( https://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/ ) in the atmosphere, which have been increasing since the industrial revolution. So, when people talk about climate change today, they mean anthropogenic (man-made) climate change. This is the warming of Earth’s average temperature as a result of human activity, such as burning coal, oil and gas to produce energy to fuel our homes and transport and cutting down trees to produce the food we eat.

Suggestions on topics to choose from

•The one you think your family member has some misunderstanding and you can use what you learned to convince them.

•Please keep the discussion civil. A peaceful learning experience is beneficial, while polarized debate is not.

•Other topics.  •https://www.skepticalscience.com/

• On the left hand side of the website

Please write a short essay

•Briefly describe the claim of the ‘climate myth’• ~ 100 words

•What are the current scientific research results and understanding about it?• ~ 200 words

•Use your own words and reasoning to rebut the climate myth. •100-200 words