Did they point out legitimate problems with the portrayal of memory loss in their chosen novel or movie? Do you see any other inaccuracies they missed, or other ways in which a real-life person would react differently than the fictional characters? 

In responding to the two student below , share your thoughts on their examples. Did they point out legitimate problems with the portrayal of memory loss in their chosen novel or movie? Do you see any other inaccuracies they missed, or other ways in which a real-life person would react differently than the fictional characters?

Maura post

 

My chosen movie for this discussion is Overboard (1987), where the main character played by Goldie Hawn is an overbearing entitled wealthy socialite, and while on her yacht, she falls overboard and hits her head and loses consciousness. Her poor single handyman, played by Kurt Russell, to whom she treats with little regard, is the one to retrieves her from the water and brings her back aboard. Once she comes to, he realizes she has no memory of who she is, so he convinces her she is his wife and the mother to his three unruly children. With her amnesia, she becomes a kind and caring mother and wife who tries desperately to remember how to care for her so-called family. All is going along nicely until she hit her head again, causing a reversal to her original amnesia.
The issues with her amnesia that are not in question are her ability to learn new tasks to care for the people in her care is supported by Goldstein (2015) “people can retain skills from the past and learn new ones.” This speaks to her ability to learn how to perform the daily tasks of caring for a family she didn’t have before the accident. The issue of Goldie Hawn’s’s character takes on a whole new personality is a bit preposterous. Baxendale (2004) who states, “personality and identity are unaffected. These distinctions, which is a medical setting, are critical in terms of prognosis and treatment, are often blurred at the movies.”
Lastly, the idea of secondary trauma to the head could reverse the amnesia is not based on any facts and merely exists for the dramatic effects of the storyline. (Baxendale, 2004, Dec. 14). A more likely scientific-based scenario would be that the second blow to the head with additional loss of consciousness would cause further damage to the brain (Traumatic Brain Injury, 2018, Sept 7).

Cheyenne Post

 

The movie that I have chosen for this week’s discussion is one of my favorite childhood movies Anastasia. Anastasia does not remember her past or where she comes from. She does recall a song that her grandmother used to sing to her. The Romanovs which is Anastasia family was attacked by a man named Rasputin who started the Russian Revolution. Anastasia, her grand-mother, and a boy named Dmitri escapes the palace but as they were running for the train that her grandmother escaped on Anastasia falls and suffers from amnesia. At around 20 Anastasia wants to go to Paris because of a music box that she has always had with her and needs a Visa to travel. She makes it to Paris and reunites with her grandmother and does get her memory back. I believe that she suffered from retrograde amnesia from when she fell and hit her head on the platform.

PART 2

FILL OUT THE TEMPLATE THAT I HAVE UPLOADED AND READ THE RUBRIC BELOW FOR MORE INSTRUCTION ON HOW TO FILL OUT TEMPLATE.
THIS IS THE OTHER LINK  https://www.innocenceproject.org/reevaluating-lineups-why-witnesses-make-mistakes-and-how-to-reduce-the-chance-of-a-misidentification/

PSY305ModuleSixPracticePresentationTemplate.pptx

PSY 305: Module Six Practice Presentation

False Memory Lab

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Eyewitness Accounts: Before this week, did you believe eyewitness accounts were reliable? Why or Why not?

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How can certain individual memories and perceptions be biased, altered, or manipulated by others?

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Provide an example of an instance when your own memory proved to be false. What did you learn about perception from that experience?

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PSY305ModuleSixPracticePresentationGuidelinesandRubric.pdf

PSY 305 Module Six Practice Presentation Guidelines and Rubric Overview: For this assignment, you will create a presentation based on this week’s CogLab experiment from your textbook, the False Memory lab. This assignment will give you some additional practice using PowerPoint, which you will need to use for your final presentation due in Module Eight. Use the Practice Presentation Template to complete this assignment. Prompt: Clinical psychologists have recently made claims, based on forensics, that memories and perceptions are unreliable, and that individual memories can be biased, altered, or manipulated by others. For this assignment, first read Chapter 8 in your textbook, then watch the video and read the article on the Innocence Project website: Eyewitness Misidentification (cc). Then, complete the CogLab 5.0 Experiment #33 on false memory. Next, based on your readings and your results on the false memory lab experiment, answer the following questions using one slide per question:

 Slide One: Before this week, did you believe eyewitness accounts were reliable? Have your thoughts changed? If yes, how? If not, why not?  Slide Two: How can certain individual memories and perceptions be biased, altered, or manipulated by others?  Slide Three: Provide an example of an instance when your own memory proved to be false. What did you learn about perception from that experience?

Summarize your answer on each slide and go into detail on the Notes page. Back up your opinion with evidence from your lab re sults, from the Chapter 8 reading, from the eyewitness misidentification article and video, and from your own experiences. You may also search for and incorporate studies or news stories into your presentation. Your instructor will provide feedback on your use of PowerPoint, which you should take into consideration when completing your final project presentation in Module Eight. After you have completed your practice presentation, take a moment to review the requirements of the Presentation section of the Final Project II Guidelines and Rubric document to familiarize yourself with the expectations of the assignment. Note: If you do not have PowerPoint, you are eligible for a free version of Microsoft Office 365 as an SNHU student. Visit Office in Education for Students, Teachers, and Schools and enter your SNHU email address to get started. Guidelines for Submission: Your presentation practice slides should address the questions above and must be submitted using the provided Practice Presentation Template.

Critical Elements Exemplary (100%) Proficient (85%) Needs Improvement (55%) Not Evident (0%) Value

Eyewitness

Accounts

Meets “Proficient” criteria and

response demonstrates keen insight into false memory and the reliability of eyewitness accounts

Describes whether or not one

believed eyewitness accounts were reliable previous to this module, and explains how thoughts have changed or not

changed

Describes whether or not one

believed eyewitness accounts were reliable previous to this module, but does not sufficiently explain how thoughts have

changed or not changed

Description is not provided 30

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=202&v=DZsckuKiH94
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https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education
http://snhu-media.snhu.edu/files/course_repository/undergraduate/psy/psy305/psy305_module_six_practice_presentation_template.pptx
http://snhu-media.snhu.edu/files/course_repository/undergraduate/psy/psy305/psy305_module_six_practice_presentation_template.pptx

Memories and Perceptions

Meets “Proficient” criteria and description demonstrates a keen

insight into how memories and perceptions can be biased, altered, or manipulated by others

Describes how certain individual memories and perceptions can

be biased, altered, or manipulated by others

Describes how certain individual memories and perceptions can

be biased, altered, or manipulated by others, but description is cursory or contains inaccuracies

Description is not provided 30

Own Memory

Meets “Proficient” criteria and

example exhibits keen insight into the fall ibility of memory

Provides an example of an

instance when one’s own memory proved to be false and describes what one learned about perception from that

experience

Provides an example of an

instance when one’s own memory proved to be false, but does not sufficiently describe what one learned about

perception from that experience

Does not provide an example 30

Articulation of Response

Submission is free of errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization, and is presented in

a professional and easy-to-read format

Submission has no major errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization

Submission has major errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization that negatively impact readability

and articulation of main ideas

Submission has critical errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization that prevent understanding of

ideas

10

Total 100%