The dissemination of EBP results serves multiple important roles. Sharing results makes the case for your decisions. It also adds to the body of knowledge, which creates opportunities for future practitioners. By presenting results, you also become an advocate for EBP, creating a culture within your organization or beyond that informs, educates, and promotes the effective use of EBP.

EVIDENCE BASED CAPSTONE PROJECT

The dissemination of EBP results serves multiple important roles. Sharing results makes the case for your decisions. It also adds to the body of knowledge, which creates opportunities for future practitioners. By presenting results, you also become an advocate for EBP, creating a culture within your organization or beyond that informs, educates, and promotes the effective use of EBP.

To Prepare:

  • Review the final PowerPoint presentation you submitted in Module 5, and make any necessary changes based on the feedback you have received and on lessons you have learned throughout the course.
  • Consider the best method of disseminating the results of your presentation to an audience.

To Complete:

Create a 5-minute, 5- to 6-slide narrated PowerPoint presentation of your Evidence-Based Project.

  • Be sure to incorporate any feedback or changes from your presentation submission in Module 5.
  • Explain how you would disseminate the results of your project to an audience. Provide a rationale for why you selected this dissemination strategy.

    Evidence Based Practice

    Student’s Name

    Institutional Affiliation

    Health care organization and its readiness for change

    The mission of my healthcare organization is to provide quality care for a healthier community.

    The organization strives to provide easily accessible quality care at lower costs.

    However, there have been issues with patient satisfaction.

    Patients have been complaining about their needs not being met by the health care providers.

    With the new management taking over, the organization is now ready for a change.

    Current problem and opportunity for change

    The rate of patients not being satisfied with the healthcare services offered has been escalating.

    This is because patients are not usually involved during the decision-making processes.

    Thus the health care organization fails to provide patient-centered care due to poor decision making.

    Improving the participation of patients in decision-making is an opportunity for change.

    The stakeholders such as the management, clinical staff, patients, and the support staff are all critical for the change.

    Evidence based idea for change

    According to Kon et al., (2016) shared decision making is an important concept in patient-centered care.

    Shared decision making ensures that medical interventions are appropriate and consistent with the patient’s values, goals, and preferences.

    However, clinicians and the patients may fail to reach a mutual decision.

    Voogdt-Pruis et al., (2019) reiterates that training of health care providers is essential in the implementation of shared decision making.

    Personal feedback is also vital in assessing the measured outcomes during implementation.

    Plan for knowledge transfer

    Once appropriate evidence has been deduced highlighting the need for change, all appropriate stakeholders need to be involved.

    The executive, the management team, the clinical staff, the supportive staff, the patients and their families need to be informed on the need for change.

    Findings from research study evaluation should first be shared with the executive.

    From there, the knowledge is disseminated to the management team.

    The information can then be further shared with the clinical staff.

    A meeting can then be scheduled where the information can be discussed at length with all stakeholders present.

    Measurable outcomes

    The evaluation stage requires measurable indicators that must be assessed.

    Such indicators highlight the performance of the organization after the implementation of the change.

    Outcomes can be measured at different levels of the shared decision-making process.

    Decision making antecedents such as patient preference and participation as well as the availability of decision aids can be assessed.

    The use of decision making aids and cases of decisional conflict are possible measurable outcomes.

    Decision regret and health outcomes can be assessed as part of decision outcomes(Sepucha & Scholl, 2014).

    Critical appraisal and Evaluation Table

    The critical appraisal of the articles was conducted using an evaluation table.

    The components of the evaluation table included the type of article, year published, methodology, findings, and conclusions.

    The articles were assessed on whether they can provide knowledge on evidence-based practice.

    Analysing the articles provided me with knowledge and skills useful in analyzing research journals.

    Evidence table

    In the evidence table, the credibility, and reliability of the articles were determined.

    The study design, the sample size used in the investigation, and evidence rating were analyzed.

    Statistical data as well as limitations of the study were also assessed.

    This was useful in evaluating whether the findings from the article were appropriate for use in decision making.

    Synthesis table

    This table was utilized in reviewing literature from multiple research studies.

    The findings from different research articles were organized and evaluated.

    Overlap in ideas between authors was determined as well as critical points from different studies.

    This was important in identifying the main ideas from the literature.

    I acquired critical skills that will be useful in applying research evidence in my clinical practice.

    References

     

    Kon, A. A., Davidson, J. E., Morrison, W., Danis, M., & White, D. B. (2016). Shared Decision Making in ICUs. Critical Care Medicine, 44(1), 188–201. https://doi.org/10.1097/ccm.0000000000001396

    Sepucha, K. R., & Scholl, I. (2014). Measuring Shared Decision Making: A Review of Constructs, Measures, and Opportunities for Cardiovascular Care. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 7(4), 620–626. https://doi.org/10.1161/circoutcomes.113.000350

    Voogdt-Pruis, H. R., Ras, T., Dussen, L. V. D., Benjaminsen, S., Goossens, P. H., Raats, I., … Vrijhoef, H. J. M. (2019). Improvement of shared decision making in integrated stroke care: a before and after evaluation using a questionnaire survey. BMC Health Services Research, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4761-2