What is the purpose and intent for Chapter 1 of a dissertation?

DISERTATION IMPORTANCE IN RESEARCH PAPER

What is the purpose and intent for Chapter 1 of a dissertation?

What have you learned while transferring your content over into the dissertation template?

Insert your dissertation title

A Dissertation Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the

Requirements for the Degree of

Doctor of Computer Science

By

Insert Your Name Here

Month Year

Committee

[Research Supervisor name], [Degree], Chair

[Committee Name], [Degree], Committee Member

[Committee Name], [Degree], Committee Member

_________________________________

Date Approved

© Insert Your Name Here, Insert the Year of Your Projected Final Presentation Here

Abstract

Insert your Abstract here in a single, double spaced paragraph using the following:

1. Includes a statement highlighting the problem under study.

2. Identifies the design (i.e., exploratory, phenomenological, quasi-experimental, correlation, etc.) NOTE: Do not mention the method (qualitative/quantitative/design science) in the abstract.

3. Identifies the study’s population and geographical location.

4. Identifies theoretical framework (quantitative) or conceptual framework (qualitative) that grounded the study; theory/conceptual framework names are lower case.

5. Describes the data collection process (e.g., interviews, surveys, etc.).

6. Describes the data analysis process (e.g., modified van Kaam method) to identify themes in qualitative studies; (e.g., t test, ANOVA, or multiple regression) to report statistical data in a quantitative study. Do not present the names of software such as SPSS.

7. Identifies the themes that emerged from the study (qualitative) or presents the statistical results from the study (quantitative).

8. Ensures the first line in the abstract is not indented.

9. Ensures Abstract does not exceed one page.

10. Uses plural verbs with data (e.g., the data were – the word data is the plural of datum).

Keywords: …

Dedication

Add a Dedication, if desired.

Acknowledgements

Add Acknowledgements.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements iv Table of Contents v List of Tables ix List of Figures x Chapter One 1 Topic Overview/Background 1 Problem Statement 2 Purpose Statement 2 Research Question 3 Hypotheses/Propositions 3 Theoretical Perspectives/Conceptual Framework 4 Assumptions/Biases 5 Significance of the Study 5 Delimitations 6 Limitations 6 Definition of Terms 6 General Overview of the Research Design 7 Summary of Chapter One 7 Organization of Dissertation (or Proposal) 7 Chapter Two 8 Topic 1 Discussion 10 Topic 1 Sub-Discussion 1 10 Topic 1 Sub-Discussion 2 10 Topic 1 Sub-Discussion 3 10 Topic 2 Discussion 10 Topic 2 Sub-Discussion 1 11 Topic 2 Sub-Discussion 2 11 Topic 2 Sub-Discussion 3 11 Topic 3 Discussion 11 Topic 3 Sub-Discussion 1 11 Topic 3 Sub-Discussion 2 11 Topic 3 Sub-Discussion 3 11 Conceptual Framework 11 Summary of Literature Review 12 Chapter Three 13 Research Tradition 13 Research Question 13 Hypotheses (Quantitative Study Only) 13 Research Design 13 Population and Sample 14 Sampling Procedure 14 Instrumentation 15 Validity 16 Reliability 17 Data Collection 18 Data Analysis 21 Ethical Considerations 22 Summary of Chapter Three 22 Chapter Four 24 Participant Demographics (if appropriate) 24 Presentation of the Data 24 Presentation and Discussion of Findings 25 Summary of Chapter Four 26 Chapter Five 27 Findings and Conclusions 27 Limitations of the Study 27 Implications for Practice 28 Implications of Study and Recommendations for Future Research 28 Conclusion 28 References 30 Appendix A 31 Appendix B 33 Appendix C 34

List of Tables

Table 1 Table Name Here #

Table 2 Table Name Here #

Table 3 Table Name Here #

Table 4 Table Name Here #

Table 5 Table Name Here #

List of Figures

Figure 1. Figure caption here #

Figure 2. Figure caption here #

x

Chapter One

Provide a concise introduction that introduces the topic and briefly establishes the main ideas and context. Details of the topic will be presented in the next section, Topic Overview/Background. Following is an organization suggestion:

Paragraph 1 – Start with sentence introducing the research topic (with a citation). Present issues/concerns indicating research that is needed.

Paragraph 2 – Offer a general sentence on the goal of the study. In addition, offer a benefit to individuals in your degree and concentration.

Paragraph 3 – Then, in the next paragraph, present the background of these issues/concerns.

Paragraph 4 – Finally, include an overview paragraph that tells the reader what the chapter is about.

Topic Overview/Background

The reader should have a sense of what is going on and why research is needed. Provide context (who, what, when, and where) so the reader will be able to follow the study plan. Citations should be utilized to support the content.

Ensure the areas below are addressed with citations:

Paragraph 1 – Why is topic of current interest (what is going on now to make this important)?

Paragraph 2 – Lays the groundwork for what has been done in the research area.

Paragraph 3 – Why is the research area of importance to practical concerns?

All should be discussed as a practical issue for stakeholders, such as managers, business administrators, or computer science specialists in your concentration.

Problem Statement

Start the section with a succinct statement on the problem as follows: The problem to be addressed in the proposed study is …

Elements of a Problem Statement include (a) a cited statement of the problem (must use a scholarly source), (b) anchor the problem using a number or statistic to illustrate its significance for doctoral research, (c) identify the gap in the literature regarding the problem, and (d) indicate how the proposed study might fill the gap.

This Problem Statement will ensure the aligning expectations are addressed:

· The general issue/observation/problem in practice leads to the need for a study.

· Citations are 5 years old or less from journal literature or Government databases.

· Problem identified is a practical problem versus a theoretical problem.

· Problem is directly connected to degree type and concentration.

Purpose Statement

Start the section with a succinct statement on the purpose as follows: The purpose of the proposed <method, design> study is to <explore = qualitative, examine = quantitative> …

After stating the succinct statement of the purpose, which is aligned to the problem, the following content should be considered for inclusion in the purpose statement:

· Aligns with the problem statement.

· Uses concise statements describing the intent of the study.

· Indicates the reason for the study.

· Research method is identified.

· Research design is identified.

· Qualitative studies identify the phenomenon/concepts.

· Quantitative studies identify the variables/constructs.

· Identifies specific population.

· Identifies the number of participants.

· Identifies the geographic location of the study.

Research Question

Research Question is aligned with problem and purpose (i.e., research question is the problem stated as a question).

Research question is not answerable with a “Yes” or “No” response.

Research question guides the researcher’s thinking to ensure the proper data are collected, which answers the problem in the problem statement or fills the noted gap.

Uses the Research Question Template Builder for qualitative research question.

Uses the following format for quantitative research question – To what extent, if any, does (independent variable) relate to (dependent variable) for (participants) at (the research site)?

Hypotheses/Propositions

The determination of using hypotheses or propositions is dependent on the methodology. Quantitative research questions use Hypotheses. Qualitative research questions use Propositions. Other methods use Propositions. The heading is adjusted to one of the presented heading words.

Hypotheses – Quantitative research includes the following:

· Rationale for the hypotheses is provided.

· Both null and alternative hypotheses are provided.

· Hypotheses are testable with each variable operationalized.

· Phrasing of hypotheses reflects nature of analysis (i.e., comparison, relationship, or association).

Propositions – Qualitative research includes the following:

Propositions are statements that relate key concepts in a logical way. Researchers use propositions to assert a universal connection between the research concepts. Think of a proposition as a statement of fact deduced by reasoning by indicating … what statements do you have that are a foundation of this research? Who and what started your research problem? Who has attempted to address the problem? What has led to the current state of the problem you are researching?

Theoretical Perspectives/Conceptual Framework

Your framework is the theoretical perspective or conceptual boundary of your study. Your problem is somewhere within the framework (theoretical perspective = quantitative; conceptual framework = qualitative; but not both).

This section is a summary of what was first written in the Conceptual Framework section of Chapter 2. Information is not presented unless found in Chapter 2.

No figure is presented in this section.

Each of the following are demonstrated within the Theoretical Perspectives or Conceptual Framework:

· Presents an overview of the broad conceptual and/or theoretical framework of the study.

· Describes how the research problem/questions are “bounded” by the framework.

· Indicates the theory under which the research falls.

· Establishes how proposed research “fits” with other research in the field.

· Discusses issues, perspectives, and, if appropriate, controversies in the field.

· Demonstrates familiarity with historical and current literature related to the discussion in this section.

Assumptions/Biases

Two paragraphs are presented in this section … one for Assumptions and one for Biases.

Include personal experience in either paragraph including assumptions or biases you have developed based on your experience.

For paragraph 1, begins with a definition of study assumptions with citation. Then, address your assumptions specific to your study. Discuss how basic assumptions underlie the research topic (i.e., facts are assumed to be true, but not verified). Discuss assumptions for the research topic as well as the methodology. Clearly indicate where an assumption stops and another begins within the writing.

For paragraph 2, begins with a definition of study biases with citation. Provide a clear statement recognizing the possibility of biases. Then, address your biases specific to the study. Discuss possible personal biases or preconceived ideas and values. Specify how biases will be managed within the framework of the study. Clearly indicate where a bias stops and another begins within the writing.

Significance of the Study

Indicates who the stakeholders are for the study. Indicates how the study will benefit these stakeholders.

Each of the following areas are addressed:

· Indicates a global reason for the study and its uniqueness.

· Indicates the anticipated value or impact to the problem domain (i.e., what is specific to business administration, computer science, or management).

· Indicates who will benefit from the study’s results (i.e., the academic field, society, a profession, the community, and/or a particular population).

Delimitations

Indicates the boundaries of the study set by the researcher.

Begins with a definition of study delimitations with citation. Then, addresses the delimitations specific to your study. Indicates the variables you are controlling (or limiting).

Clearly indicates where a delimitation stops and another begins within the writing.

Limitations

Begins with a definition of study limitations with citation and …

· Discusses limitations are the research aspects the researcher cannot control (i.e., the potential weaknesses).

· Discusses the variables the researcher cannot control or limit.

· Indicates any limitations because of instrument validity/reliability issues.

Clearly indicates where a delimitation stops and another begins within the writing.

Definition of Terms

Presents definitions representing key operational terms or words that are unique and/or critical to reader understanding (i.e., defined in an unusual manner or have more than one definition)

Definitions are supported with citations while minimizing quotations.

The dictionary is not used to cite the definition of terms.

The following formats are used:

Term: The term is . . . (reference, year).

Phrase of words: The phrase of words is . . . (reference, year).

No more than 10 definitions will be used.

General Overview of the Research Design

This section aligns with the Summary of Chapter Three section.

Provides an overview of the study methodology and design.

Provides an overview of the study data collection plan.

Provides an overview of the study data analysis plan.

Summary of Chapter One

Summarizes key points presented in Chapter 1 (with supporting citations).

Introduces Chapter 2 and presents its importance to the study.

Transitions the reader to Chapter 2.

Organization of Dissertation (or Proposal)

The heading is adjusted to one of the presented heading words (i.e., Proposal for the Proposal submittal and Dissertation for the final Manuscript).

Presents a brief discussion of how the Proposal (i.e., Chapters 1, 2, and 3) / Dissertation (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) is organized.

Chapter Two

Chapter 2 is a presented review of the literature within the study specified framework.

Chapter 2 is specific to the research topic and proposed study.

The researcher accomplishes three things during the process of developing Chapter 2: (a) the researcher develops subject matter expertise in the topics related to his/her research topic, (b) the researcher identifies and substantiates a gap in the body of knowledge (the research topic) that will be addressed by the study, and (c) the researcher develops a conceptual framework which informs the research design.

The researcher presents and discusses key literature related to his/her topic and makes the connection between these and his/her research topic.

The review of the literature in Chapter 2 demonstrates the researcher’s mastery of the literature in his/her area of study.

A synthesis of the literature is continually presented to preclude a Chapter 2 that is written as another textbook. The synthesis is an organization of information that reflects the researcher’s critical thinking, which supports the direction the specific research will take. This synthesis may be presented in a variety of ways, but often is topological or chronological, or both. Discussion has depth and presents a critical thinking perspective that compares and contrasts the literature being analyzed.

Chapter 2 uses summaries at the end of sections/subsections to ensure the reader understands the key aspects of the discussion just presented.

Chapter 2 presents a story of the emergence or evolution of the problem being studied.

Chapter 2 presents a clear existence of a problem/gap in the literature needing a research solution.

The synthesis in Chapter 2 provides the foundation for the Conceptual Framework section, which is a narrative and visual picture of how the literature examination and subsequent critical thinking combine to form a “whole” and represents the researcher’s intellectual approach to the study. As a result, it is clear to both the researcher and readers how the topics discussed are seen in relationship to each other from the unique perspective of the researcher, and supported by the literature.

All paragraphs in Chapter 2 will cite at least two different references (exceptions may occasionally exist) using evidence-based writing.

No figures or tables are presented in Chapter 2 unless the figures or tables are the creation of the researcher. No “paraphrasing” of a figure or table is allowed per copyright law. If a figure or table is desired for use or modification in Chapter 2, permission from the figure/table Publisher is obtained before the figure/table is inserted into Chapter 2.

Chapter 2 will have a minimum of 20 pages of writing (not counting figures or tables included in Chapter 2).

Chapter 2 will not exceed 40 pages of writing (not counting figures or tables included in Chapter 2).

Chapter 2 will have a minimum of 100 references from credible sources (e.g., peer-reviewed literature, journals, exemplary dissertations, industry publications, and government publications). All references in the References section must be cited at least once in the narrative. All citations will have a reference in the References section.

Chapter 2 will have exemplary grammar, few grammar errors, and minimal syntax errors. Exemplary paragraph structure includes a topic sentence, focusing on one topic, transitioning to the next paragraph.

Chapter 2 is compliant with APA guidelines and the CTU Dissertation Template.

———————————————————————————————

Under the CHAPTER TWO heading, the following format, style, and content are used:

The introduction for Chapter 2 (no heading is shown) includes the following:

· The introduction for chapter two should begin with a summary of the purpose statement.

· Presentation continues with a brief explanation of the logical organization of the literature review.

· It should also provide a brief explanation of the literature search strategy that was used and a description of the sources.

· Finally, the introduction should indicate how the chapter is organized.

Chapter 2 is presented in a systematic manner using APA Level 1 and Level 2 headings with sub-paragraphs such as the following:

Topic 1 Discussion

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 1 Sub-Discussion 1

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 1 Sub-Discussion 2

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 1 Sub-Discussion 3

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 2 Discussion

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 2 Sub-Discussion 1

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 2 Sub-Discussion 2

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 2 Sub-Discussion 3

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 3 Discussion

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 3 Sub-Discussion 1

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 3 Sub-Discussion 2

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

Topic 3 Sub-Discussion 3

Paragraphs are presented here using evidence-based writing.

… (Continue with needed Topic Discussion and Topic Sub-Discussion sections).

Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework is a narrative linking the models, constructs, theories, researcher’s assumptions and beliefs, and any other relevant elements into a coherent framework which shows the researcher’s logic for the proposed/completed research.

In this section, a figure is presented depicting the Conceptual Framework. The figure includes the research question to demonstrate how the research question is related to or bounded by the Conceptual Framework.

Summary of Literature Review

In the Summary of the Literature Review section, the following are addressed:

· Presents key points presented in Chapter 2 (with supporting citations), not an overview.

· If not previously presented, contradictions, uncertainties, and gaps are highlighted to demonstrate the need for the study.

· Transitions the reader to Chapter 3 by presenting a brief overview of what will be addressed in the next chapter.

Chapter Three

Restates the research problem (copy and paste from Chapter 1).

Restates the research purpose (copy and paste from Chapter 1).

Reflects a brief overview of the chapter.

Research Tradition

Addresses the following to ground the research plan according to the established research tradition of using a methodology and a design:

· Indicates the purpose of using a methodology in research.

· Indicates what methodology will be used for the study and why.

· Indicate why other methodology options will not be used.

· Indicates the purpose of using a design in research.

· Indicates what design option will be used for the study and why.

· Indicates why other design options will not be used.

Citations are used to support and justify these research tradition statements.

Research Question

Restates the research question (copy and paste from Chapter 1).

Hypotheses (Quantitative Study Only)

Restates the research hypotheses (copy and paste from Chapter 1).

Research Design

Indicates the organization of the research design and the sections of the research design that will be addressed. Elaborates why the research design accomplishes the study goals and why the research design is the optimum choice for the research (beyond what was stated in Research Tradition section).

Population and Sample

Two paragraphs are presented in this section … one for Population and one for Sample.

For paragraph 1, begins with a definition of population with citation. Then, address the population identified in the Research Question, which is specific to your study. Provide the location of the population and the estimated size of the population. Indicates why the population is appropriate for the study. Provides citations that support and justify the population for the study.

For paragraph 2, begins with a definition of sample with citation. Next, define sample size with citation. Indicates the sample size for the study and how the sample size was determined for the study (i.e., for qualitative – references previous studies that have used similar sample sizes; for quantitative – a power analysis is used). Provides citations that support and justify the sample size for the study.

Sampling Procedure

Begins with the definition of a sampling procedure and indicates the sampling procedure that will be used in the study. The sampling procedure is described and justified based on sample size derived in the Population and Sample section.

Indicates the process of identifying participants and obtaining approval from participants to support the study within the participant’s organization. Indicates the process of identifying participants and obtaining approval from non-organization related participants (e.g., LinkedIn).

Participants are characterized by establishing selection criteria.

Provides citations that support and justify the sampling procedure for the study.

Instrumentation

Instrumentation discussion is presented, which is appropriate for qualitative or quantitative research.

Provides citations that support and justify the instrumentation for the study.

Qualitative

The researcher is described as an implicit part of the research and must collect valid and reliable data. Qualitative researchers often serve as the instrument. Qualitative research uses open-ended questions.

During data collection, semi-structured interview questions will be used to capture data from face-to-face interviews. The interview process uses interview questions to capture the participant’s perceptions after each participant has signed the Informed Consent form presented in Appendix A. Interview questions are presented in Appendix B. Each interview is expected to last 45-60 minutes. The interview protocol is presented in Appendix C.

A digital-voice recorder (or equivalent) is used as the primary data collection tool for the study. If Skype (or equivalent) is used, video and audio will be used and recorded. Handwritten notes of each participant’s interview will capture observation information (i.e., body language).

Labeling of the captured data and participant’s identity will ensure anonymity (e.g., participants are labeled P1, P2, P3, …, and P10). At no time during data collection will personal identification information be captured.

Quantitative

Indicates the name of the existing instrument(s) that will be used. How the survey is organized into demographic, independent variable(s), and dependent variable(s) sections is indicated. The survey questions used for each survey section are indicated (presented in Appendix B). How each survey question is measured and reported to the researcher is indicated. If survey question responses are combined to establish the variable’s answer, this combination technique is described. Describes why the survey is appropriate for the study.

During data collection, the process of how the survey questions will be distributed, how the responses are gathered, and how the results are reported is described (e.g., Survey Monkey or personally). Describes the process participants must use to complete the instrument. Each survey participant will be required to check a box that is labeled “Acknowledge Consent Information” and will not be able to start the survey if this box (or equivalent) is not checked.

Permission to use instrument(s) are presented in an Appendix. If Survey Monkey (or equivalent) is used, acknowledgements of intent to distribute the survey and gather/report responses to the survey by Survey Monkey (or equivalent) are presented in an Appendix. If an instrument is reused/modified from another researcher, permission to use/modify is obtained from the researcher (permission is included in an Appendix).

Validity

Presents evidence the instrument(s) performs as the researcher claims it will perform.

Provides citations that support and justify the validity for the study.

Qualitative

Describes validity, its importance to the study, and its application to the study.

Describes dependability, its importance to the study, and its application to the study.

Describes credibility, its importance to the study, and its application to the study.

Describes transferability, its importance to the study, and its application to the study.

Describes confirmability, its importance to the study, and its application to the study.

Quantitative

Describes how validity indicates your control of the situations affecting your research.

For measurement, describes how validity means your instrument properly measures the intended content.

For methodology, describes how validity refers to the accuracy or credibility of your research while considering internal and external validity.

Describes how internal validity is the extent to which your research design allows accurate conclusions about your study’s relationships.

Describes how external validity is the extent to which your study’s results or conclusions can be generalized to other situations.

Describes how construct validity is the extent to which your research uses adequate definitions and measures of variables without which the research would reach different results.

Reliability

Indicates whether the instrument(s) consistently gather the same information over time and circumstance.

Provides citations that support and justify the reliability for the study.

Qualitative

Describes how reliability is the consistency with which researchers measure the results of an instrument.

Describes member checking and how it is performed to improve reliability.

Describes triangulation and how it is performed to improve reliability.

Describes a pilot study and how it is performed to improve reliability.

Quantitative

Describes how reliability is a necessary, but insufficient condition for validity.

Describes how the consistency of data collection confirms the reliability of the study’s data.

Describes how the internal consistency of participant response data for the study will be tested.

Describes what will be demonstrated to reduce the chance of error related to internal reliability.

Describes the need for Test-Retest Reliability measures and/or Inter-rater reliability measurement.

Data Collection

Research question guides the data collection process necessary to capture needed information.

Indicates step-by-step process used to capture data while using the Instrument(s) described in the Instrument section.

Provides citations that support and justify the data collection process for the study.

Qualitative

Indicates face-to-face interviews are the preferred technique of qualitative data collection using semi-structured interview questions.

Indicates that no data are collected from a participant until the Informed Consent form (see Appendix A) is signed and presented to the Researcher.

Indicates an interview protocol will be established (see Appendix C) to guide the interview process, including establishing follow-on questions for each interview question.

Indicates all face-to-face interviews will record the audio of the interview (video recordings will not occur in a face-to-face interview).

Indicates all interviews are expected to take 45-60 minutes.

Should Skype be used, audio will be recorded and camera observation of the participant during the interview is provided.

Indicates note taking during the interviews occurs to capture participant observations that cannot be recorded on the audio recorder.

Each interview will include the following general process: (a) establish rapport with the participant; (b) introduce the study, its purpose, and its constraints; (c) obtain a signed consent agreement form (see Appendix A), (d) use the interview protocol (see Appendix C) to ensure all questions are asked and are in the correct format, (e) use probing techniques of the silent probe, overt encouragement, elaboration, clarification, and reflection; (f) thank the participant for their time and efforts.

Indicates how the recorded audio information will be transcribed to a Microsoft Word file.

Indicates the data collection process is completed once member checking is completed for all participants.

Indicates all collected data will be stored in password-protected files (or under lock-and-key) for 5 years and then destroyed.

Quantitative

Indicates closed-ended survey questions are the preferred technique of quantitative data collection.

Indicates that no data are collected from a participant until the Informed Consent form information (see Appendix A) is acknowledged before the participant gains access to the survey. Failure to acknowledge the informed consent form information will stop the survey process for the participant.

Indicates a survey protocol will be established (see Appendix C) to guide the survey process, including establishing the issuance of the survey, obtaining raw data from the participant’s responses, and obtaining any consolidated report data.

Indicates the expected time to complete the survey.

Indicates the questions used to gather information for independent variable(s), how the information is measured (e.g., a 5-point Likert scale), and what the responses indicate for each question.

Indicates the questions used to gather information for dependent variable(s), how the information is measured (e.g., a 5-point Likert scale), and what the responses indicate for each question.

Indicates the questions used to gather information for demographics and how the information is measured.

Presents the steps for collecting these data in an organized manner.

Indicates how the collected data from participant responses will be obtained and in what format.

Indicates any filtering of responses that will occur and the inclusion/exclusion criteria used to perform this filtering.

Indicates any data cleaning needed upon receiving response data from the participants.

Indicates how response data from the surveys is prepared for analysis by converting appropriate numerical values associated with the independent and dependent variables.

Indicates all collected data will be stored in password-protected files (or under lock-and-key) for 5 years and then destroyed.

Data Analysis

Provides the step-by-step process for analyzing the collected study data and arriving at the study conclusions.

Provides citations that support and justify the data analysis process for the study.

Qualitative

Describes the steps used to derive the Findings and Conclusions of the study.

Describes the coding rules used that map textual units into data terms.

Describes the technique used to translate data terms into themes.

Describes how these themes and combinations of themes are recorded as the study findings.

Describes any variations to the traditional qualitative design being applied as stated in the Research Tradition section.

Describes any software tool(s) used to assist the Researcher.

Quantitative

Describes the steps and test technique(s) used to test the study hypotheses needed to establish the study Findings and Conclusions.

Indicates how raw data is prepared for analysis.

Indicates the summarized data with techniques such as frequency tables, figures, means, proportions, and descriptive cross tabulations.

Distinguishes the data as categorical or continuous.

Prepares the data for analysis using measures of dispersion, normal distribution, and sampling variation to ensure awareness of range, standard deviation, and variance.

Determines the type of statistical analysis (e.g., measuring group differences (comparison) or relating variables (correlation)).

Describes how respondent’s independent and dependent variable inputs are converted into inputs for testing of the null hypotheses.

Describes the test for internal consistency.

Ethical Considerations

Describes the ethical principles applied throughout the research process.

Describes how the principles of the Belmont Report protocol are maintained during the study.

Describes how the Research ensures no harm comes to participants due to participation in the study.

Describes the importance and use of the Informed Consent form (see Appendix A).

For non-participant studies, describes additional principles beyond the Belmont Report for addressing applied Internet data analysis as shown in the Menlo Report.

Provides citations that support and justify the ethical considerations for the study.

Summary of Chapter Three

This section aligns with the General Overview of the Research Design section in Chapter 1.

Provides an overview of the study methodology and design.

Provides an overview of the study data collection plan.

Provides an overview of the study data analysis plan.

Provides citations that support and justify the summary of Chapter 3.

Transitions the reader to Chapter 4.

Chapter Four

Presents an overview of the purpose of the study.

Presents an overview of the chapter.

Participant Demographics (if appropriate)

Presents data in tables accompanied by narrative.

Presented data is not interpreted, just reported.

Tables are used to present the study data in APA format and referred to correctly.

Presentation of the Data

Briefly describes the data collection process for the study.

Qualitative

Describes the pilot study process and results.

Presents the interview questions.

Briefly describes the data analysis process for the study.

Presented study data are organized by interview questions indicating themes that emerged from each interview question and quotes from participants that reinforce the appropriateness of the themes.

Tables are used to present the study data in APA format, referred to correctly, and accompanied by narrative.

Quantitative

Presents operationalized research questions and hypotheses.

Briefly describes the data analysis process for the study.

Presented study data are organized by the independent and dependent variables using techniques such as frequency tables, figures, means, proportions, and descriptive cross tabulations.

Tables are used to present the study data in APA format, referred to correctly, and accompanied by narrative.

Presentation and Discussion of Findings

Provides evaluation of previously presented data in logical progression of items addressed, which helps the reader follow the technique used for gathering data and generating findings.

Qualitative

Presents aggregated theme data from all interview questions in one or more tables. The aggregated theme data represents the Findings of the study.

Presents narrative reporting the meaning of the Findings.

Enough information is presented so the reader can make an independent judgment about the Findings.

Quantitative

Presents the results of testing the significance of the relationship between the independent variable(s) and the dependent variable(s).

Indicates whether the null hypotheses were accepted/rejected. The null hypothesis acceptance/rejection data represents the Findings of the study.

Presents narrative reporting the meaning of the Findings.

Enough information is presented so the reader can make an independent judgment about the Findings.

Summary of Chapter Four

Summarizes the Findings from the study (which will be the focus of the Chapter 5 conclusions).

Transitions the reader to Chapter 5.

Chapter Five

Presents a brief overview of the problem statement for the study.

Presents a brief overview of the purpose statement for the study.

Presents a brief overview of the research methodology for the study.

Presents a brief overview of the study limitations for the study.

Presents a brief overview of the ethical dimensions for the study.

Presents a brief overview of the chapter.

Findings and Conclusions

Briefly describes the data collection and the data analysis processes for the study, which led to the Findings presented in Chapter 4.

Organizes this section by individual Findings from Chapter 4.

Presents narrative of each Finding from Chapter 4.

Interprets and presents the significance of each Finding, with citations, when compared / contrasted with the Literature in Chapter 2.

Provides conclusive indications of whether (a) each Finding agrees with the literature, (b) each Finding disagrees with the literature, and/or (c) each Finding varies with the literature.

Evaluates the importance, significance, and meaning of each conclusive indication to various stakeholders and constituents noted in the Significance of the Study section of Chapter 1 (e.g., administrators, employees, researchers, managers, technologists, and the community).

Limitations of the Study

Indicates the Assumptions, Limitations, and Delimitations from Chapter 1 and any impact they may have had on the study results.

Indicates any Limitations that emerged during the execution of the study.

Implications for Practice

Presents a recap of the problem statement.

Indicates why and how each individual Finding is relevant to addressing/improving/solving the problem that was studied.

Indicates the importance of the synthesized conclusive indications to the practitioners in the field.

Discuss how any potential limitations may affect the application of the conclusive indications in practice.

Implications of Study and Recommendations for Future Research

At least three recommendations for practical applications of the study are presented (i.e., who would benefit from the study conclusions and why). Note: all recommendations must be supported by the study findings.

At least three recommendations for future research are presented.

Conclusion

The conclusion section contains citable information and statements for researchers that want to build upon the study’s results.

Presents “bottom line” messages to the reader and why the study was so important.

Aligns the study conclusions with the Chapter 2 literature; specifically addressing, (a) do the conclusions agree with the literature, (b) do the conclusions disagree with the literature, and/or (c) do the conclusions vary with the literature?

Indicates what the Research Question addressed.

Indicates what was measured, analyzed, and what were the findings.

Indicates the implications of the findings.

Indicates the conclusions derived from each of the findings.

Indicates what readers of the conclusions should understand.

Presents the final statements regarding the alignment of the research question with the research conclusions.

Provides citations that support and justify the conclusions of the study.

References

Add references here. (References section contains at least 100 references in Final Dissertation).

Textbook reference examples

Rue, L. W., & Byars, L. L. (2003). Management: Skills and application (10th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Scott, W. R. (2003). Organizations with rational, natural, and open systems (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Senge, P. M. (1990). The fifth discipline: The art & practice of the learning organization. New York, NY: Currency Doubleday.

 

Journal article reference examples

Nutt, P. C. (2004). Expanding the search for alternatives during strategic decision-making. Academy of Management Executive, 18(4), 13–28. doi:10.1108/01437730910991664

Ravichandran, T. W., Smith, J. R., Jr., & Lertwongsatien, C. R. (2005). Effect of information systems resources and capabilities on firm performance: A resource-based perspective. Journal of Management Information Systems, 21, 237–276.

Clay, R., & Jones, B. (2008, June). Science is the key: Psychologists fight back about the misuse of research. Psychology Monitor Online, p. 8. Retrieved from http://www.monitoronline/news_at_glance.html

High, R. (2000). Important factors in designing statistical power analysis studies. Computing News, para. 5. Retrieved from http://cc.uoregon.edu/cnews/summer2000/statpower.html

 

Dissertation reference examples

Mancini, V. T. (2004). The relationship between shared governance management structure and registered nurse satisfaction: A comparison of two hospitals. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B. Sciences and Engineering, 51(11), 5246.

Nair, A. T. (2002). An examination of ISO 9001 implementation in career and technical education (Doctoral dissertation, Pennsylvania State University). Retrieved from http://www-static.pennstate.edu/~asb/dissertations/

Horn-Hasley, K. (2007). An examination of school culture and student engagement in a test-focused age of accountability (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. (3273640)

 

The above examples are for format only and not actual references.

Appendix A

Informed Consent

Title of Study:

Investigator:

Contact Number:

Purpose of the Study

You are invited to participate in a research study. The purpose of this study is to (insert your response here)

Participants

You are being asked to participate in the study because (state the specific reason you’re asking this person to participate – ex: “your opinions, outlook, and insights with respect to the research question are critical to …” ex: “you are an active member in the XXX with the experience, knowledge, and insights…”).

Procedures

If you volunteer to participate in this study, you will be asked to do the following: (explain, in detail, what you will ask the participant to do during their participation).

Benefits of Participation

There may/may not be direct benefits to you as a participant in this study. However, we hope to learn (explain what you hope to learn about).

Risks of Participation

There are risks involved in all research studies. This study is estimated to involve minimal risk. An example of this risk is (insert your explanation of possible risk. Ex: “possibly feeling uncomfortable answering question about your organization”).

Cost/Compensation

This will be no financial cost to you to participate in this study. The study will take (provide time estimate). You will not be compensated for your time. University of the Cumberlands will not provide compensation or free medical care for an unanticipated injury sustained as a result of participating in this research study.

Contact Information

If you have any questions or concerns about the study, you may contact (insert investigator and faculty member name, e-mail, and phone number). For questions regard the rights of research subjects, any complaints or comments regarding the manner in which the study is being conducted, you may contact University of the Cumberlands – Doctoral Programs at (800) 343-1609

Voluntary Participation

Your participation in this study is voluntary. You may refuse to participate in this study or in any part of this study. You may withdraw at any time without prejudice. You are encouraged to ask questions about this study at the beginning or at any time during the research study.

Confidentiality

(Please specifically describe how the data will be securely stored and how the records will be securly stored and when the records will be destroyed.)

Participant Consent

I have read the above information and agree to participate in this study. I am at least 18 years of age. A copy of this form has been given to me.

______________________________________ _____________________

Signature of Participant Date

______________________________________

Participant Name (Please Print)

Appendix B

Insert the Interview Questions or the Survey Questions here

Appendix C

Insert the Interview Protocol or the Survey Protocol here

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