How can development be classified? According to Paiget, there are four factors that shape development: equilibration, maturation, active experience, and social interaction. His stages of cognitive development are sensorimotor, preoperational, preconceptual, intuitive, concrete operations, and formal operations (LeFrançois, 2011).Do you agree with Piaget? I do agree with Piaget. He makes it clear that learning is far more than a simple process of moving information from the teacher to the student.

Cognitive Development Learning Theories (respond to peers)Guided Response: As you read the responses of your classmates, consider how theories of cognitive development are important for teachers to know when working with their students. Respond to at least two of your classmates with an analysis of their examples and consider possible limitations with either Piaget’s or Vygotsky’s theories. Be sure to ask for clarification if you find a particular aspect of another post confusing or not fully-developed. Be sure to respond to any queries or comments posted by your instructor.BY:Alisha BighamWeek 1 Discussion 2Choice AHow do children adapt?Children adapt through the processes of assimilation and accommodation. To assimilate is to respond in terms of pre-existing information using previously learned behaviors. To accommodate is to change a behavior in response to a given situation. Assimilation involves little change in the child’s cognitive system because old learning and old behaviors are being used and practiced. But accommodation involves changes in the mental system because old behaviors and old learning are now being modified (LeFrançois, 2011).How can development be classified? According to Paiget, there are four factors that shape development: equilibration, maturation, active experience, and social interaction. His stages of cognitive development are sensorimotor, preoperational, preconceptual, intuitive, concrete operations, and formal operations (LeFrançois, 2011).Do you agree with Piaget? I do agree with Piaget. He makes it clear that learning is far more than a simple process of moving information from the teacher to the student. He suggests that meaningful learning and development result from a highly active process in which learners construct knowledge (LeFrançois, 2011).What is the value for teachers of understanding Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development? Apply this to your own role as a future educator. Piaget’s cognitive theory has had a profound impact on educational practices. It directs the teacher’s attention to the child’s developmental level. Children will profit from instruction when they have the concepts and understanding to do so (LeFrançois, 2011). This theory will help me be aware of my student’s capabilities, what they already know, and what is likely to be meaningful and interesting (LeFrançois, 2011).ReferenceLeFrançois, G. (2011). Psychology for teaching (11th ed.). San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.BY: Rosalyn James. Give an example of what is meant by Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development (ZPD). Explain how your example fully illustrates your understanding of ZPD. Also, describe at least two educational implications of this concept. Use the concept of scaffolding in your answer.I may be completely wrong, but I am going to try to come up with an example for ZPD. Let’s say Johnny is in kindergarten and with much scaffolding from his teacher, has learned his letters and letter sounds. The teacher has systematically developed prerequisite skills required for more demanding tasks (LeFrançois, 2011). The teacher then then explains to him that if you put the letter sounds together, you can make words. The teacher uses c-a-t to make cat as an example. The teacher has demonstrated how to complete the task. After a few more examples, Johnny is then able to work on his own sounding out 3 letter words. This is now within his ZPD.To my understanding, ZPD is the range of what the student can do based on age and ability. The student should be challenged on a level that is just outside of the ZPD.LeFrançois, G. (2011). Psychology for teaching (11th ed.). San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.