List three attributes of both verbal and non-verbal communication. Verbal Communication Formal or informal speech Differences in tone Speed: Fast and slow Non-verbal Communication Gestures/sign language to converse without words. Facial expressions can show feelings and can connect with individuals. Written words, such as a letter or email communication.

1. List three attributes of both verbal and non-verbal communication. Verbal Communication Formal or informal speech Differences in tone Speed: Fast and slow Non-verbal Communication Gestures/sign language to converse without words. Facial expressions can show feelings and can connect with individuals. Written words, such as a letter or email communication.

Attachments:

CHCCOM005

Communicate and work in health or community services

 

Assessment 1

Assessment task 1: Activity workbook

 

This activity workbook will be completed as you progress through the Learner Guide and learning materials.

 

Instructions for Student

  1. Download Activity workbook from iLearn
  2. Save Activity workbook onto your computer
  3. Complete each activity as directed from your Learner Guide
  4. Submit the completed Activity workbook (24 activities) via the iLearn assessment submission area.

 

Index of activities

Activity 1A – estimated time 30 minutes. 2

Activity 1B – estimated time 30 minutes. 3

Activity 1C – estimated time 20 minutes. 4

Activity 1D – estimated time 25 minutes. 5

Activity 1E – estimated time 30 minutes. 6

Activity 2A – estimated time 20 minutes. 7

Activity 2B – estimated time 30 minutes. 8

Activity 2C– estimated time 30 minutes. 9

Activity 2D – estimated time 20 minutes. 10

Activity 3A – estimated time 25 minutes. 11

Activity 3B – estimated time 20 minutes. 12

Activity 3C– estimated time 20 minutes. 13

Activity 4A– estimated time 20 minutes. 14

Activity 4B– estimated time 20 minutes. 15

Activity 4C– estimated time 20 minutes. 16

Activity 4D– estimated time 25 minutes. 17

Activity 5A– estimated time 20 minutes. 18

Activity 5B– estimated time 25 minutes. 19

Activity 5C– estimated time 10 minutes. 20

Activity 5D– estimated time 20 minutes. 21

Activity 6A– estimated time 30 minutes. 22

Activity 6B– estimated time 20 minutes. 23

Activity 6C– estimated time 15 minutes. 24

Activity 6D– estimated time 15 minutes. 25

 

 

 

Activity 1A – estimated time 30 minutes

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to recognise how verbal and non-verbal communication can be used to enhance understanding and demonstrate respect.

 

 

  1. List three attributes of both verbal and non-verbal communication.

Verbal Communication

Formal or informal speech

Differences in tone

Speed: Fast and slow

 

Non-verbal Communication

Gestures/sign language to converse without words.

Facial expressions can show feelings and can connect with individuals.

Written words, such as a letter or email communication.

 

  1. Briefly explain Lasswell’s model of communication and how this differs with the Shannon and Weaver model of communication.

Lasswell’s model of communication describes an act of communication by defining who said it, what was said, in what channel it was said, to whom it was said, and with what effect it was said. It is regarded by many communication and public relations scholars as “one of the earliest and most influential communication models.

 

The Shannon and Weaver Model of Communication argues that communication can be broken down into 6 key concepts: sender, encoder, channel, noise, decoder, and receiver.

 

Lasswell created not too long after the Shannon Weaver model was made. The big difference between the two is that Lasswell’s model studies mass communication, as opposed to a simple two-person conversation. A big factor in this model is predicting the effect the message has on the group.

 

  1. Why should you demonstrate respect in your communications at work in community services?

 

 

Activity 1B

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to communicate service information in a manner that is clear and easily understood.

 

  1. Give details of the communication and how you made the information clear so this could be understood.

 

Asking if the information has been understood

Checking if further information is required

Repeating key points/information

Encouraging a discussion to confirm that understanding has been made

Providing supporting written information.

 

  1. How can networking help you within the workplace?

 

  1. Give an example of a situation where you have communicated information to another person.

 

Activity 1C

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to confirm the person’s understanding

 

  1. How can you confirm a person has understood you? Provide four examples of actions you can take.

 

 

 

  1. Give examples of how you would needed to summarise information to clarify understanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 1D

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to recognise how to listen to requests, clarify meaning and respond appropriately.

 

 

  1. Briefly describe what reflection skills are.

 

 

 

  1. What is motivational interviewing?

 

 

 

  1. Why should you use collaboration over confrontation at work?

 

 

Activity 1E

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to identify how to exchange information clearly in a timely manner and within confidentiality procedures.

 

 

  1. What precautions can you take to ensure confidentiality is kept during verbal communication? Provide three examples.

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 2A

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to explain how to carry out workplace instructions.

 

 

  1. What information should you retain when receiving instructions? Provide three examples.

 

 

 

  1. What information should you write down when receiving a message? Provide four examples.

 

 

Activity 2B

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to identify lines of communication between organisation and other services.

 

  1. Identify three types of additional services that you may recommend a client could use for their benefits.

 

 

 

  1. What types of service providers are there in the health care system? Provide two examples.

 

 

 

  1. What three national subsidy strategies exist in Australia?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 2C

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to use industry terminology correctly in verbal, written and digital communications.

 

 

  1. Give three examples of each the following:

 

  • Workplace acronyms
  • Workplace abbreviations
  • Workplace slang
  • Asap
  • FYI
  • EOD
  • N/A
  • COB
  • TBD

 

For each example, give the term used and explain what it means or refers to.

 

 

Activity 2D

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to follow communication protocols that apply to interactions with different people and lines of authority.

 

 

 

  1. When you start working in a future community service organisation how would you follow the right communication protocols with your colleagues and managers?

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 3A

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to identify early signs of potentially complicated or difficult situations and report according to organisation procedures.

 

 

  1. Identify three difficulties that you may experience at your future workplace as a carer and explain how you would deal with each and report them.

 

  1. Highlight two of the issues facing health care in Australia?

 

Activity 3B

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to identify actual constraints to effective communication and resolve using appropriate communication strategies and techniques.

 

  1. Identify an individual and a cultural constraint in communication that you can accommodate.

 

 

  1. What are cultural misunderstandings and how can they be avoided?

 

Activity 3C

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to recognise how communication skills can be used to avoid, defuse and resolve conflict situations.

 

  1. Give an example of a situation where you have successfully defused and resolved an issue of conflict.

 

 

  1. Define a conflict of interest.

 

 

Activity 4A

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to comply with legal and ethical responsibilities and discuss difficulties with supervisor.

 

  1. What are the duty of care and legal requirements for your future work role as a carer?

 

 

 

  1. What is an ethical dilemma? How could you deal with it in your future work setting? Who would you see for help or advice from and how?

 

 

Activity 4B

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to refer any breach or non-adherence to standard procedures or adverse event to appropriate people.

 

  1. Give an example of each:

 

  • Breach in the duty of care
  • Non adherence to standard procedure
  • Adverse event to client

 

For each, explain the issue, how you would report it and to whom.

 

 

 

 

Activity 4C

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to identify employee, employer and/or client rights and responsibilities.

 

 

  1. What rights and responsibilities do you have as a carer? Provide three examples.

 

 

  1. Suggest two responsibilities that a client has?

 

 

Activity 4D

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to identify employee, employer and/or client rights and responsibilities.

 

 

  1. Suggest five ways of preventing conflict in the workplace?

 

 

  1. When and how should you refer an issue of conflict to your supervisor/manager?

 

Activity 5A

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to complete documentation according to legal requirement and organisation procedures.

 

 

  1. Complete the example of a work report/documentation that you would need to fill out for your work role as a carer. Briefly explain what this is, when you would use it, and how this helps you and the service.

 

(Insert client intake form here)

 

Activity 5B

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to read workplace documents relating to role and clarify understanding with supervisor; and complete written and electronic workplace documents to organisation standards.

 

  1. Why should you ensure that you fully understand the workplace documents that you need to read?

 

 

  1. Provide five examples of documents that you would need to complete to organisational standards.

 

Activity 5C

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to follow organisation communication policies and procedures for using digital media.

 

  1. Using “Help me out” policy and procedures describe the communication policy & procedures for the use of digital media.

 

  1. List five digital media communication tools

Activity 5D

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to use clear, accurate and objective language when documenting events.

 

 

Simulated activity:

 

A patient/client has visited your service to ask for assistance with a healthcare matter, for example, they require additional medication or have requested to see a specific worker. They are displaying signs of stress/agitation and have requested a quick response.

 

Provide an account of this below in a clear manner, for passing to the appropriate person.

 

When you are working as a carer in your future organisation there is a client who is displaying signs of stress/agitation and clearly indicated an immediate additional help.

 

How would you use clear accurate and objective language when documenting this event and providing the right appropriate response  for the client.

 

Activity 6A

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to contribute to identifying and voicing improvements in work practices.

 

  1. Select two items from this list and explain why they are important for the care industry:

 

  • A holistic and person-centred approach
  • Promotion of the wellbeing of staff, clients and communities
  • Early identification of problems
  • Delivery of appropriate services
  • Commitment to meeting the needs and upholding the rights of people
  • Commitment to empowering the person and/or the community
  • Ethical behaviour
  • Preventative strategies
  • Exercise of responsibilities and accountabilities within the context of duty of care for clients.

 

 

 

  1. From the items selected identify an area that could be improved and answer the following:

 

  • What is the issue?
  • What could be improved about it?
  • How would you achieve this?
  • What would this solve?

 

 

 

 

Activity 6B

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to promote and model changes to improved work practices and procedures in accordance with organisation requirements

 

 

 

  1. How would you improve your work practices in accordance with the organisation you are working for?

 

 

Activity 6C

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to seek feedback and advice from appropriate people on areas for skill and knowledge development.

 

  1. How would you seek feedback for developing your skills and knowledge as a carer and who would you seek this from?

 

Activity 6D

Objective

 

To provide you with an opportunity to consult with manager regarding options for accessing skill development opportunities and initiate action.

 

 

  1. What options for skills development would you take into consideration when working as a carer?

 

 

 

Activity 6E

 

  1. How would you collaborate with your future colleagues using effective communications.

 

 

  1. What is the difference between collaboration and confrontation?

 

 

  1. Why is collaboration always better than confrontation in the workplace?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q1.         In the space below, list four (4) signs of potential problem situations in the workplace?

1.
2.
3.
4.

 

Q2.         Follow workplace conflict procedures.

Click on the link below to view the workplace conflict procedures and answer the following questions?

Procedures link

2a.          If the complaint involves the employee’s supervisor – the employee should schedule an appointment with that supervisor to discuss the problem that gave rise to the complaint within how many working days?

 

 

2b.          If the discussion with the immediate supervisor does not resolve the problem to the mutual satisfaction of the employee and the supervisor, or if the supervisor does not respond to the complaint, the employee may submit a what?

 

 

2c.          If the employee is dissatisfied with the decision of the director/department head, the employee may appeal this decision in writing to the HR department within how many working days working days.

 

Q3.         Click on the link below and watch the video, then answer the questions below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_nM3NBCo-M

 

The above video features a number of conflicts in the workplace.

Choose one of the examples from the video and answer the following questions.

3a.          What was the cause of the conflict?

 

 

 

3b           What technique was used to resolve the conflict?

 

Scenario

Julia just finished a certification appointment for Maria, a participant who has cerebral palsy. Maria has some difficulty speaking and uses a wheelchair for mobility. As they head toward the door, Maria says something to Julia.

Julia replies, “I’m sorry, I didn’t understand what you said.” Maria repeats her comment.

Julia looks confused and says, “One more time please?” Maria repeats her comment in a louder voice.

Looking a bit flustered, Julia says, “Okay, well, maybe we can talk about that next time.” Julia reaches for the door and says, “Let me get that for you.”

Maria, at the same moment, angrily pushes the button for the automatic door and rolls away. Julia walks back to her office feeling embarrassed and that she is no good at working with disabled participants.

 

Q4.         What could Julia have done differently to avoid or minimize this conflict?

 

Julia Says What might work better?
“I’m sorry, I didn’t understand what you said.”  

 

Julia looks confused and says, “One more time please?”
Looking a bit flustered, Julia says, “Okay, well, maybe we can talk about that next time.” Julia reaches for the door and says, “Let me get that for you.”
Julia reaches for the door and says, “Let me get that for you.”

 

 

 

Scenario

A clinic in a diverse area employs several bilingual staff. There is a group of staff who speak Hmong, and they often converse in their native language at work.

John, an employee who doesn’t speak their language, feels self-conscious and sometimes wonders if they are talking about him. He frequently complains to his friend at work about other staff not speaking English.

One day John walks into a meeting room and several staff are already there, speaking in Hmong. John walks in and says, “Hello.” The other staff say “Hello” back and then resume their conversation, which John does not understand. John rolls his eyes and sits down on the other side of the room to wait for the meeting to start.

 

Q5          Why might the bilingual staff choose to speak in their native language?

 

John What might work better?
John feels self-conscious and sometimes wonders if they are talking about him. He frequently complains to his friend at work about other staff not speaking English.  

 

 

Q6.

The objective of the WHS Act is to ensure that a safe workplace is created free from risk or illness or injury. List four (4) workplace systems where compliance to the Act must be demonstrated.

1.

3.

4.

 

Q7.

Define Negligence?

 

Q8.         Mandatory notifications are important and situations of urgency and concern that fit into this category should be reported. List five (5) mandatory reporting issues.

 

 

Q9.         Rights and responsibilities

 

 

Employees and employers have rights and responsibilities in the workplace.

Referring to the Rights and responsibilities box.

 

Place the numbers for all the employee’s rights

into the employee’s rights box.

 

 

Place the numbers for all the employer’s rights Into the employers rights box.

 

Employees rights Employers rights

 

 

Workplace Conflict Procedures

Step 1: Discussion with supervisor

Initially, employees should bring their concerns or complaints to their immediate supervisor. If the complaint involves the employee’s supervisor, the employee should schedule an appointment with that supervisor to discuss the problem that gave rise to the complaint within five working days of the date the incident occurred.

The immediate supervisor should respond in writing to the complaint within five days of the meeting held with the complainant employee.

Step 2: Written complaint and decision

If the discussion with the immediate supervisor does not resolve the problem to the mutual satisfaction of the employee and the supervisor, or if the supervisor does not respond to the complaint, the employee may submit a written complaint to the employee’s director/department head. Employees may request assistance with writing their complaints from the human resource (HR) department.

The employee’s director/department head should forward a copy of the complaint to the HR department.

The submission of the written complaint is due within five working days of the response from the supervisor. The complaint should include:

The problem and the date when the incident occurred.

Suggestions on ways to resolve the problem.

A copy of the immediate supervisor’s written response or a summary of his or her verbal response and the date when the employee met with the immediate supervisor. If the supervisor provided no response, the complaint should state this.

Upon receipt of the formal complaint, the director/department head must schedule a meeting with the employee within five working days to discuss the complaint. Within approximately five working days after the discussion, the director/department head should issue a decision both in writing and orally to the employee filing the complaint.

Step 3: Appeal of decision

If the employee is dissatisfied with the decision of the director/department head, the employee may, within five working days, appeal this decision in writing to the HR department.

The HR department may call a meeting with the parties directly involved to facilitate a resolution or refer complaints to a review committee if it believes that the complaint raises serious questions of fact or interpretation of policy. The HR department may gather further information from involved parties.

 

Return to question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scenario Activity

Instructions for students

  1. Read the following scenarios ensuring you are familiar with the HelpMeOut.Org policy and procedures [Appendix A /Appendix B/Appendix C]
  2. Complete 3 x Case Management Forms
  3. Please explain in detail for the three scenarios below how you would demonstrate effective communication skills to correctly understand the needs of your client.
  4. How did you communicate the client’s needs to your colleagues to help your clients better?
  5. How did you understand and work on the feedback given to you by your clients.
  6. Please make sure you fill the forms in detail provided in this booklet for all three scenarios

 

 (Refer to Appendix D of Helpmeout.org.au to access the services offered to your clients)

Scenario 1

Imaging you are a support carer; your Client Mrs Jose who lost her husband 10 years ago requires in-home care support.

Mrs Jose is 75 years old and has lived on her own for the past 10 years. She is hard of hearing, very weak and has been assessed by the ACAT team for in home support.  Mrs Jose has been diagnosed with Osteoarthritis and Type 2 diabetes.

Mrs Jose’s mobility has decreased due to her osteoarthritis and her failing health. There is pain in her joints which restricts her from walking and doing household chores. Her hearing loss is deteriorating day by day. She requires assistance with her personal care, cleaning and reminders to take her medication and remember her appointments with her specialists. Her mobility is fair and Mrs Jose is mobile for now but in pain. She can manage herself with assistance.

She is constantly refusing to take her medication as she believes it doesn’t help and it is deteriorating her even more.  She has convinced herself she doesn’t need it.

She feels isolated as she can’t communicate well due to her hearing impairment. She is often teary and sad because of all this.

 

 

 

Scenario 2

You are a community support carer; your Client Tom Barnes requires in-home support. 

Tom is 80 and has been a heavy smoker all his life. He has recently been diagnosed with chronic smoker’s cough and has been seeing his GP who has referred him to a specialist.

Tom Coughs all day which makes him feel weak; he does not eat well and is very frail and unable to do anything. He has also had an ACAT assessment for some in-home support.

Tom has been advised to give up smoking and has done so but is not coping well. He has been experiencing symptoms such as fatigue, weight loss, hoarseness, wheezing, difficulty swallowing, and chest pain. He is determined to overcome this and is complying with his doctor’s instructions. He is quite headstrong and always has to have his own way. Tom requires in-home housekeeping and some support with personal care and cooking. He is very fussy about the food he wants to eat.

 

Scenario 3

You are a community support carer; your Client Alice and her husband require in-home support.

Alice is 65 years old and had been in good health until six months ago when she had a heart attack. She underwent emergency heart surgery, after the surgery she hasn’t been keeping well. Her heart has become weak which triggers fluid retention, particularly in the lungs, legs and abdomen. She can’t carry out the daily chores for her-self.

She lives with her husband Jack (72) who is a paraplegic and has support from a Disability support organisation for his personal care as Alice can no longer cope. They have two adult children who live away.

Her family has a difficult time talking about her heart attack, surgery and future health. She is feeling better but knows she needs to continue to eat healthier and exercise. She attends a monthly meeting at the local Chronic Care Centre for education and support regarding rehabilitation.

Alice has talked with her husband about some of her rehabilitation programs but it made no sense to him. Alice wants to make an appointment with a Healthcare Professional at the clinic to help her find ways to communicate with her family for her mental and physical wellbeing and explain to her family that she needs rehabilitation for her well -being and to cope well with her illness.

 

 

 

For your reference

 

Appendix A – Helpmeout.org

 

Privacy and Confidentiality Category: Knowledge Management Policy and Procedure

 

Privacy and Confidentiality

Confidentiality: For the purposes of this policy, confidentiality is defined as the limitation of the access, communication, movement and storage of private and personal information, whether related to clients, staff, volunteers, students, contractors or external third parties.

Personal information:  Is information or an opinion (including information or an opinion forming part of a database), whether true or not, and whether recorded in a material form or not, about an individual whose identity is apparent, or can reasonably be ascertained, from the information or opinion.

Health information:  Is personal information about an individual collected by a health service provider in the course of providing a health, disability, palliative or aged care service. This includes not only information about an individual’s health, disability or services received but also other information such as an individual’s employment details, financial details and next of kin, even though these details do not relate to the individual’s health or disability.

Private information Includes:  Information or an opinion about an individual’s:

  • State of health
  • Racial or ethnic origin
  • Political
  • Philosophical or
  • Religious opinions, beliefs or affiliations
  • Membership of a professional or trade association or union
  • Sexual preferences or practices
  • Criminal record

PROCEDURES:

Privacy – Staff, contractors, students and volunteers are required to inform clients of the following facts: •

  • Why they are collecting personal and/or sensitive information about them and how the information will be used.
  • What information is held about them and who else will receive the information.
  • That they have the right to access this information through written application to the CEO.
  • That they have a right to appoint an advocate of their choice to act / speak for them on their behalf or that HelpMeOut.org.au will provide an appropriately authorised representative to advocate for them if they so wish.
  • That information may only be disclosed to another party by the HelpMeOut.org.au staff with their consent (unless exempted by law). In the case of disclosure of written information, (e.g. referral to another service provider) consent must be in writing.
  • Privacy brochure must be handed out and explained if necessary

DUTY OF CARE

This refers to the obligation to take responsible care to avoid injury to a person whom, it can be reasonably foreseen, might be injured by an act or omission. A duty of care exists when someone’s actions could reasonably be expected to affect other people. If someone is relying on you to be careful, and that reliance is, in the circumstances, reasonable, then it will generally be the case that you owe them a duty of care. You need to be clear about exactly what the nature of the care or support is that you are providing, and on which the person is relying. Failure to exercise care in that situation may lead to foreseeable injury (in other words it could have been avoided with due care taken).

Duty of care in more detail

Duty of care can arise in all aspects of life, not just in community support services. The following scenario illustrates the application of duty of care in a broader sense.

Mike runs a small business making and bottling gourmet vinegars. He bottles his vinegars in a garden work shed. One day he accidentally knocks over and breaks one of his bottles. Mike didn’t realise that some of the glass from the broken bottle got into a full bottle of vinegar before it was capped. Mike sells the vinegar to the local deli, who sells it to Susan. Susan ends up with a badly cut throat from the glass.

Did Mike owe Susan a duty of care? Yes. Even if he had never met Susan, he should have been able to foresee that someone would buy and use the vinegar, and that the way it was manufactured and bottled would affect them. Because Susan bought the bottle of vinegar that Mike made, Susan became the person to whom Mike owed a duty of care.

With the introduction of legislation and standards of care in the CSI (such as the Disability Services Act and Standards) community expectations have risen in recent years about what constitutes duty of care. It is no longer acceptable for people to experience physical harm and negligence while in a care situation, and we recognise the shameful treatment of ‘orphans’ and Aboriginal children in institutional care in Australia in the 1950s.

The practice of suing organisations has become more acceptable as we strive to improve the level of care provided and take duty of care considerations seriously. It is generally the case that, in services, the employer is responsible for negligence of staff. This means that any costs are carried not by the individual staff member who has been negligent but by the organisation itself. Organisations have professional indemnity insurance to cover such situations.

 

Dignity of risk

Associated with duty of care is the concept of dignity of risk. Dignity of risk refers to a person’s right to experience all that life has to offer, such as learning a new skill or taking part in an activity that may entail some element of risk, but has benefits that might include gaining greater self-esteem and independence.

Most people with disabilities wish to lead lives which are as close as possible to that of people who do not have a disability and this inevitably involves taking some risks. Courts and the law of negligence do not, therefore, expect disability workers to shield their clients from all possible risks. They do, however, expect workers to take reasonable care (to be sensible and cautious) in their work.

This concept arises out of the key principles of the Disability Services Act and Standards. For example ‘People with disabilities have the same rights as other members of Australian society to realise their individual capacities for physical, social, emotional and intellectual development’ (Parsons, 1997). It can, however, pose concerns and dilemmas for staff. Value clashes between clients and workers also can play a role here as well.

Appendix B

Case Management Form 1
Client:
Address:
Case Workers name:  
Date Completed:  
Reported To:
Client Need:  

 

Client Need:
Client Need:
Client Need:
Suggested Provision for needs  

 

 

 

 

 

Date of follow up
Observation /managing of services of your client
Clients environment condition observation  

 

 

Action Required in clients environment to increase standard of living:
Possible health risks due to environment:
Discussion of environment held with client
A colleague at your work place from whom you sought help for client and what was the help  

 

 

 

How did you resolve conflict between yourself and your colleague when negotiating time frames with them on helping the client
Knowledge observations for supervisor
Case worker signature:
 

Date:

Case Manager  Signature:  
 

Date:

 

 

 

Case Management Form 2
Client:
Address:
Case Workers name:  
Date Completed:  
Reported To:
Client Need:  

 

Client Need:
Client Need:
Client Need:
Suggested Provision for needs  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date of follow up
 

 

Observation / managing of services of your client

Clients environment condition observation  

 

 

Action Required in clients environment to increase standard of living:
Possible health risks due to environment:
Discussion of environment held with client
A colleague at your work place from whom you sought help for client and what was the help
How did you resolve conflict between yourself and your colleague when negotiating time frames with them on helping the client
Knowledge observations for supervisor  

 

 

 

Case worker signature:
 

Date:

Case Manager  Signature:  
 

Date:

 

 

 

Case Management Form 3
Client:
Address:
Case Workers name:  
Date Completed:  
Reported To:
Client Need:  

 

Client Need:
Client Need:
Client Need:
Suggested Provision for needs  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date of follow up
 Observation/ managing of services of your client
Clients environment condition observation  

 

 

Action Required in clients environment to increase standard of living:
Possible health risks due to environment:
Discussion of environment held with client
A colleague at your work place from whom you sought help for client and what was the help  

 

 

 

How did you resolve conflict between yourself and your colleague when negotiating time frames with them on helping the client
Knowledge observations for supervisor
Case worker signature:
 

Date:

Case Manager  Signature:  
 

Date:

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix C

Questions – Scenario Activity

 

For each of the above scenarios reflect upon the following points and explain in detail:

  • How did you use verbal & non-verbal communication methods to support your client & enhance their understanding of their ailments and condition? 
  • Reflect upon the impact your communication had with the client on their future health and wellbeing.

 

 

  • How did you identify their support needs & decide upon the services that can assist them in accordance with your organisations policy and procedures?

 

 

 

  • How did you demonstrate effective communication skills in clarifying workplace instructions with 2 colleagues from whom you sought help to provide service to your clients? 

 

  • What strategies did you use to manage and negotiate timeframes with them for the fulfilment of your client’s needs? 

 

 

  • How did you resolve conflict with your colleagues using your communication skills?

 

 

 

Appendix D

Client Services at Helpmeout.org.au

Helpmeout.org.au has been supporting people since the first Helpmeout community support worker visited a client at home over 5 years ago.

Home is where the heart is. Our aim is to see every person happy, healthy and safe in the place they feel most comfortable – i.e. their home, surrounded by their loved ones – family, friends and special memories.
At Helpmeout.org.au we offer a range of services for in home care.

  1. Our friendly and professional team can support you with:
  • everyday jobs like doing the dishes, cleaning and tending to the garden
  • keeping the pantry stocked with groceries and preparing healthy meals
  • travelling to and from outings with friends and family
  • taking you to your doctor’s appointments
  • personal care so you’re looking and feeling great
  • getting back on your feet after an illness or injury or managing more challenging health conditions
  • Supporting the people caring for you.

We’ll tailor your support so you can be as independent as possible. As you change, your support will change with you.

  • Domestic assistance – help with everyday household tasks such as dishwashing, house cleaning, clothes washing, shopping and paying bills.
  • Social support – assistance to keep up with essential activities, shopping, banking, social contacts and activities.
  • Nursing care – health care services provided to a client by a Registered or Enrolled Nurse.
  • Gardening and home maintenance – assistance with minor works in your home and garden.
  • Personal care – assistance with tasks such as eating, bathing and grooming.
  • Allied health – comprises a range of specialist services including podiatry, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and social work.
  • Centre based day care – group activities in a community centre or other location.
  • Meals – preparation and delivery to the client at home or provided at a centre.
  • Respite care – in home respite gives the carer a break from regular caring duties.
  • Assessment– provides accurate and complete information about each client’s needs.
  • Transport – assistance for the client to attend appointments and other activities.
  • Client care coordination – assessment for multiple services and regular reviews.
  • Case management– a qualified staff member coordinates the planning and delivery of services required for each client.
  • Advocacy, counselling and information– advice about rights and responsibilities, information about community and health issues.

Each worker at Helpmeout.org.au is defined with specific duties and they work in liaison with each other to make our clients happy and satisfied.

Each worker has his or her role to play to make our clients the happiest people on Earth.