women in the 19th century dealt with abuse to how women today

Compare the book “Hard Time” and “Oliver Twist” how women in the 19th century dealt with abuse to how women today deal abuse. For instance in the 19th century when women married their assets when to the male.

women in the 19th century dealt with abuse to how women today deal abuse

Firstly, Compare the book “Hard Time” and “Oliver Twist” how women in the 19th century dealt with abuse to how women today deal abuse. For instance in the 19th century when women married their assets when to the male. There was no law that could grant a women a divorce.

Also, What are the changes like?

No matter the term used to identify the abuse of women in nineteenth-century
Britain—domestic violence, spousal abuse, marital violence, or wife-beating—it was written
about by leading authors of the time. Indeed, there is no such phrase as “domestic violence”
in the nineteenth century (Lawson and Shakinovsky 2). However, because it is more
comprehensive in scope than the other terms used during this period and because it
encompasses other actions that I propose constitute abuse, I will primarily use it throughout
this paper. In addition, I will refer to victims of domestic violence by using the female
pronoun. Although there are cases of husbands being abused by their wives, the majority of
victims of abuse—and all of the ones analyzed for this paper—are female.

The works of fiction analyzed for this paper include Oliver Twist (1838) by Charles
Dickens, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (1848) by Anne Brontë, Janet’s Repentance (1858) by
George Eliot, The Woman in White (1860) by Wilkie Collins, and The Adventure of the
Abbey Grange (1904) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In an attempt to span the Victorian era
(1837-1901) and—in the case of Doyle’s short story exceed it by three years—I chose works
published from 1838–1904.