standardized testing

Researched Essay: Instructions COMP 100 From the syllabus: Students will submit three formal argumentative essays for this class: a literary analysis (LA), a researched essay (RE), and a public opinion piece (POP) based on the researched essay. Students will be required to submit complete drafts of the first two essays, revise them in response to instructor comments, and resubmit the revised essays for grading. Annotated bibliography: Students will submit an annotated bibliography as part of the researched essay assignment. The bibliography will demonstrate knowledge of the research process and the ability to evaluate source materials. INSTRUCTIONS: The second major writing assignment (essay) of the semester is the Researched Essay (RE). Students will research a socially significant issue being debated in the US today, complete an annotated bibliography (AB) of their sources, and develop a rhetorically sophisticated argument about how to address the issue. The essay will take the form of a thesisdriven, researched argument that takes part in an existing conversation, and will clearly demonstrate the validity of its claim using reasoned argumentation, rhetorical appeals, detailed support, and purposeful organization. It will not simply be a report on, or summary or description of, the existing debate. It will have to be focused on the thorough development of a single idea, and this idea will be one with high stakes – a significant matter of concern. Instructor approval: Students must submit a list of five topic summaries, in order of personal preference, to the instructor for approval. As indicated on the schedule in our syllabus, this is due in class on Thursday 10/11. In order for your topic to be approved, your list must be complete (according to instructions in the syllabus), and your topic must be SPECIFIC – “climate change,” “cancer,” “immigration,” “economy,” etc., are too broad; you must work to narrow your focus so as to have a clear direction for pursuing your research. I will also not approve topics that are already overdone (legalization of marijuana, lowering the drinking age, etc.), nor those that are based in bias or ignorance rather than substance (climate change is a hoax, abortion is murder, etc.). Annotated bibliography: The AB documents sources relevant to the RE. Like any bibliography or works cited list, it includes bibliographic information for each source. However, it is also annotated, meaning that it also includes a brief summary and evaluation of the contents of each source along with its bibliographic information. The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) has lots of helpful information about annotated bibliographies. You can access this information at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/annotated_bibliographies/index.html. Sources: Sources must be reputable: academic, journalistic, governmental, scientific, and the like. Things like Wikipedia, amateur blogs, propaganda, and similar sources MAY NOT be used. We will discuss this matter (“information literacy”) in class on the research day. If you have additional questions regarding the appropriateness or reputability of any sources you wish to use, speak to me about them well ahead of the AB and/or RE due dates. The AB must include at least 12-15 annotated entries; at least 8-10 of these sources must be meaningfully incorporated into the content of the RE. SUGGESTIONS ON HOW TO PROCEED: Your greatest resources for the AB and RE are your sources, this handout, the “On Research” handout, the “Rhetorical Appeals” handout, the Purdue OWL, and (above all) your They Say, I Say text, which not only provides helpful rubrics to aid you in elaborating your argument, but also contains lots of important discussion about how to understand researched academic writing as entering a conversation. Study these resources carefully and frequently. REQUIREMENTS: Word count: 2500-3000 words Formatting: MLA. For MLA formatting guidelines, go to the Purdue Online Writing Lab here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_style_introduction.html. Submission: Each student will have to complete a rough draft for an in-class workshop, and will then be responsible for submitting a first draft and a final draft to designated online drop-boxes on Turnitin. Details about how to do this will be discussed in class and Blackboard announcements. Due dates: R 10/11: Topic list due in class T 10/16: Research question and 4-5 AB entries due in class R 10/18: 4-5 additional AB entries due in class F 10/19: COMPLETE AB due (Turnitin) R 10/25: Draft of thesis statement and introductory paragraph for RE due for in-class workshop T 10/30: Complete RE draft printed for in-class workshop F 11/2: Revised first draft of RE due for instructor feedback and grading (Turnitin) F 11/9: First draft of RE returned with feedback and grade (Turnitin) F 11/20: Revised final draft of RE due for final grading (Turnitin) RUBRIC (next page) à Researched Essay: Rubric (COMP 100)