fictional show (not a documentary) on cable/satellite TV

Select one episode of a fictional show (not a documentary) on cable/satellite TV or a streaming service and develop a clear and methodical media analysis.

Fictional show (not a documentary) on cable/satellite TV

Select one episode of a fictional show (not a documentary) on cable/satellite TV or a streaming service and develop a clear and methodical media analysis. What this entails is the following: a description of the media thorough enough to build an argument, an argument or a position that you the author takes on the basis of observable evidence, and developing the details of that evidence in a way that supports your argument.
On every level, this paper will gravitate around your argument (your thesis). So it’s important to keep in mind that if you’re thinking of including details about the show that do not in some way help support your thesis those details are likely unnecessary.
You might want to think of the paper on the following terms to help guide its organization (organization is key).

 

Introduction:

 

This should be no more than a single paragraph. In it, you’ll set the stage for the paper: what is the show, the episode, and why is it worth investigating? Build a tension: there has to be a reason you’ve chosen it, so say it. Of course, you’ll also need to state your thesis (i.e. “In this paper I will argue…”), and lastly, tell us how you’re going to support the claim you make in the thesis. Using what evidence? Taken together, this intro paragraph tells us (the reading audience) why the paper is being written, what your position is, and how you’re going to argue it. Think of it as a sort of ‘road map’ that prepares the reader for what’s to come.

Writing a good intro is difficult. Why? Because it requires a lot of thought. This doesn’t happen in 10 minutes. But a clear and well-crafted introduction is almost always indicative of a strong paper to follow, so spend the time on this.

 

Description:

 

It’s likely that the reader will need to learn some details about the show in order to understand what it is (characters, plot, etc). So you might want to include a brief section? that develops a bit of broader context before drawing on the finer details of the show as evidence.

 

Evidence/Analysis:

 

Here you will want to think about 2-3-4 moments/themes/characters in the episode during which your thesis comes true. Where’s the evidence for your thesis? What, precisely, led you to argue what you did in the intro? It could be the case that there are 10-15 items worth talking about. So it’s your job to decide which ones make it into the paper by askingthe following.  Which items are most deserving of our attention?

Writing this section takes some thought in terms of how you might organize and present this info in the most succinct way possible.

For clarity and organization, you might want to develop discrete sections with titles for each item. For instance, if you want to develop the paper according to individual characters, you could have one section per character. Or if you want to develop it according to particular turning points in the plot, then organize it in that way. Whatever you choose, remember that each of these items are directly related to your thesis and each will be listed in the ‘road map’ indicated in the introduction?

 

Conclusion:

 

In no more than one paragraph, revisit the intro developed at the outset. Restate what it is you set out to argue.  How you developed your analysis throughout the paper, and what it all might mean moving forward.