2016 Democratic or Republican National Conventions

Research online accounts of either the 2016 Democratic or Republican National Conventions. Read some journalistic accounts of the convention schedule, the significant speakers,,,,

2016 Democratic or Republican National Conventions

Research online accounts of either the 2016 Democratic or Republican National Conventions. Read some journalistic accounts of the convention schedule, the significant speakers, and the process by which the presidential and vice presidential candidates for the party were selected.
How do Emile Durkheim’s ideas of “totemism,” “mana,” and “collective effervescence” help us to understand this political convention? What is the relationship between the formation of a unified political party and the “ritual” events that took place during this convention?
Finally, how, in your opinion, does religion as a category influence the enactment of this secular, community forming ritual?

More details;

In 2016, both the Democratic and Republican conventions were held before the Summer Olympics instead of after, as was the case in 2008 and 2012. Eisenhower first captured the Republican presidential nomination in 1952.

Who attends the Democratic National Convention?

Firstly, delegates from all fifty U.S. states and from American dependencies. Secondly, territories such as Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Further, super-delegates which are unpledge d delegates representing the Democratic establishment. All the above attend the convention and cast their votes to choose the Party’s presidential candidate.

How does the Democratic primary work?

In primaries, party members vote in a state election for the candidate they want to represent them in the general election. After the primaries and caucuses, each major party, Democrat and Republican, holds a national convention to select a Presidential nominee.

How do Democratic caucuses work?

Unlike primary elections in most other U.S. states, where registered voters go to polling places to cast ballots, Iowans instead gather at local caucus meetings to discuss and vote on the candidates.